The Aldus Shakespeare: With Copious Notes and Comments, Volume 10, Page 2

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Bigelow Smith, 1909
 

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Page 18 - Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me: the brain of this foolish-compounded clay, man is not able to invent any thing that tends to laughter, more than I invent or is invented on me: I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.
Page 79 - There is a history in all men's lives, Figuring the nature of the times deceased ; The which observed, a man may prophesy, With a near aim, of the main chance of things As yet not come to life ; which in their seeds, And weak beginnings, lie intreasured. Such things become the hatch and brood of time...
Page 40 - Thou didst swear to me upon a parcel-gilt goblet, sitting in my Dolphinchamber, at the round table, by a sea-coal fire, upon Wednesday in Whitsun-week, when the prince broke thy head for liking his father to a singingman of Windsor; thou didst swear to me then, as I was washing thy wound, to marry me, and make me my lady thy wife.
Page 161 - Make less thy body hence, and more thy grace; Leave gormandizing; know the grave doth gape For thee thrice wider than for other men. Reply not to me with a fool-born jest: Presume not that I am the thing I was; For God doth know, so shall the world perceive, That I have turn'd away my former self; So will I those that kept me company.
Page 136 - Therefore, my Harry, Be it thy course to busy giddy minds With foreign quarrels, that action, hence borne out, May waste the memory of the former days.
Page 160 - King. I know thee not, old man. Fall to thy prayers ; How ill white hairs become a fool, and jester...
Page 83 - tis certain ; very sure, very sure : death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all ; all shall die.
Page 76 - Wilt thou, upon the high and giddy mast, Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge, And in the visitation of the winds, Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them. With deaf ning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes...
Page 122 - Than all thy brothers : cherish it, my boy, And noble offices thou mayst effect Of mediation, after I am dead, Between his greatness and thy other brethren : Therefore omit him not ; blunt not his love, Nor lose the good advantage of his grace By seeming cold or careless of his will ; For he is gracious, if he be observed : 30 He hath a tear for pity and a hand Open as day for melting charity...
Page 135 - God knows, my son, By what by-paths and indirect crook'd ways I met this crown; and I myself know well How troublesome it sat upon my head.

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