The Privy Council of England in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, 1603-1784, Volume 2

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Johns Hopkins Press, 1928 - 519 pages
 

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Page 99 - That from and after the time that the further limitation by this act shall take effect, all matters and things relating to the well governing of this kingdom, which are properly cognizable in the privy council by the laws and customs of this realm, shall be transacted there, and all resolutions taken thereupon shall be signed by such of the privy council as shall advise and consent to the same.
Page 32 - Royal ; but you shall let and withstand the same to the uttermost of your power, and either cause it to be revealed to his Majesty himself, or to such of his Privy Council as shall advertise his Majesty of the same.
Page 48 - Council table, as was usual; and Sir Richard Browne did tell his Majesty he would call the person whose work it was to provide it: who being come, did tell his Majesty that he was but a poor man, and was out 4 or 500l.
Page 9 - No man will avow having been the King's Counsellor in this business ; and some wonder, that his Majesty in constituting the privy Council, having promised that he would have no cabinet Council, but that he would in all things follow their advices, next unto those of his great Council the Parliament, should so suddenly prorogue that great Council, without so much as asking the other ' : Algernon Sidney to Henry Savile, 2 June 1679, Letters, pp.
Page 100 - I have had the honour to serve the Crown, and if I could have submitted to influence, I might have still continued to serve; but I would not be responsible for others. "I have no local attachments: it is indifferent to me whether a man was rocked in his cradle on this side or that side of the Tweed...
Page 33 - Crown by act of parliament, or otherwise against all foreign Princes, Persons, Prelates, States, or Potentates. And generally in all things, you shall do as a faithful and true servant ought to do to His Majesty. So help you God, and the holy contents of this book.
Page 345 - This board is a sort of temperate bed of influence; a sort of gently ripening hot-house, where eight members of parliament receive salaries of a thousand a year, for a certain given time, for doing little, in order to mature at a proper season, a claim to two thousand, to be granted for doing less, and on the credit of having toiled so long in that inferior laborious department.
Page 207 - Council to discourse concern" ing pressing of men ; but Lord ! how they meet ; " never sit down : one comes, now another goes, " then comes another ; one complaining that no" thing is done, another swearing that he hath " been there these two hours and nobody come.
Page 208 - ... Committee of the Council to discourse concerning pressing of men ; but Lord. ! how they meet ; never sit down : one comes, now another goes, then comes another ; one complaining that nothing is done, another swearing that he hath been there these two hours and nobody come. At last...
Page 11 - Parliament without their advice, but had proceeded to a dissolution against it. To this the King replied that in matters of this nature, which were so plain, and wherein he was so fully convinced, as of the necessity of dissolving this Parliament, he could not divest himself of that power of resolving without the plurality of votes...

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