The Autobiographies of Edward Gibbon

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J. Murray, 1896 - 435 pages
 

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Page 89 - What recks it them? What need they? They are sped; And, when they list, their lean and flashy songs Grate on their scrannel pipes of wretched straw; The hungry sheep look up, and are not fed, But, swoln with wind and the rank mist they draw, Rot inwardly, and foul contagion spread : Besides what the grim wolf with privy paw Daily devours apace, and nothing said: But that two-handed engine at the door Stands ready to smite once, and smite no more.
Page 362 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar school : and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and, contrary to the king, his crown and dignity, 40 thou hast built a paper-mill.
Page 124 - That in the university of Oxford, the greater part of the public professors have for these many years given up altogether even the pretence of teaching.
Page 67 - To the University of Oxford I acknowledge no obligation; and she will as cheerfully renounce me for a son as I am willing to disclaim her for a mother. I spent fourteen months at Magdalen College; they proved the fourteen months the most idle and unprofitable of my whole life...
Page 151 - Curchod were the theme of universal applause. The report of such a prodigy awakened my curiosity ; I saw and loved. I found her learned without pedantry, lively in conversation, pure in sentiment, and elegant in manners; and the first sudden emotion was fortified by the habits and knowledge of a more familiar acquaintance.
Page 87 - To take up half on trust, and half to try, Name it not faith, but bungling bigotry. Both knave and fool the merchant we may call, To pay great sums, and to compound the small: For who would break with Heaven, and would not break for all ? Rest then, my soul, from endless anguish freed,' Nor sciences thy guide, nor sense thy creed.
Page 32 - By quick instinctive motion, up I sprung, As thitherward endeavouring, and upright Stood on my feet : about me round I saw Hill, dale, and shady woods, and sunny plains...
Page 231 - But every man who rises above the common level has received two educations: the first from his teachers; the second, more personal and important, from himself.
Page 26 - Call, is still read as a popular and powerful book of devotion. His precepts are rigid, but they are founded on the gospel : his satire is sharp, but it is drawn from the knowledge of human life ; and many of his portraits are not unworthy of the pen of La Uruyere. If he finds a spark of piety in his reader's mind, he will soon kindle it to a flame...
Page 316 - It has always been my practice to cast a long paragraph in a single mould, to try it by my ear, to deposit it in my memory, but to suspend the action of the pen till I had given the, last polish to my work.

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