The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

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G. Walker, 1820
 

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User Review  - pjskimin - LibraryThing

Picked up this entire set in excellent condition at a library sponsored used book sale for $60.00. hands down one of my best finds. Read full review

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User Review  - donbuch1 - LibraryThing

This classic series represents the Western canon not without academic controversy. The latest volumes of the Great Books include some women writers, but they are still definitely underrepresented ... Read full review

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Page 486 - No, Sir ; there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.
Page 145 - If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father.
Page 387 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Page 11 - To omit for a year, or for a day, the most efficacious method of advancing Christianity, in compliance with any purposes that terminate on this side of the grave, is a crime of which I know not that the world has yet had an example, except in the practice of the planters of America, a race of mortals whom, I suppose, no other man wishes to resemble.
Page 487 - Whoe'er has travell'd life's dull round, Where'er his stages may have been, May sigh to think he still has found The warmest: welcome at an inn.
Page 268 - I'll make Goldsmith forgive me; ' and then called to him in a loud voice, ' Dr. Goldsmith, something passed today where you and I dined: I ask your pardon.' Goldsmith answered placidly, 'It must be much from you, sir, that I take ill.
Page 32 - ... supposing your arguments to be weak and inconclusive. But, Sir, that is not enough. An argument which does not convince yourself, may convince the judge to whom you urge it ^ and if it does convince him, why, then, Sir, you are wrong, and he is right.
Page 248 - Then we upon our globe's last verge shall go, And see the ocean leaning on the sky ; From thence our rolling neighbours we shall know, And on the lunar world securely pry.
Page 256 - ... happiness ; that these ought not to be lost ; and that the gentleman on whose account she was divorced had gained her heart while thus unhappily situated. Seduced, perhaps, by the charms of the lady in question, I thus attempted to palliate what I was sensible could not be justified ; for when I had finished my harangue, my venerable friend gave me a proper check : ' My dear sir, never accustom your mind to mingle virtue and vice. The woman's a whore, and there's an end on't.
Page 345 - There are few ways in which a man can be more innocently employed than in getting money.

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