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M. Bailly ; the observations on Modern Italy, from Dr Moore, and particularly from Mr Swinburne, to whom every classical scholar is obliged for his accurate account of the South of Italy and of Sicily. In the account of the manners of the Germans, which is almost entirely taken from Tacitus, he has availed himself of the elegant translation of that author by Mr Murphy: the description of Modern Syria and Egypt is mostly copied from the travels of M. Volney and Savary; the geography of India, from the excellent Memoir of Major Rennell; the account of the trade to India and to the New World, of the man. ners of the Hindoos, and of the native inhabitants of America, from the admired works of Dr Robertson. The ancient history, geography, and mythology, have been carefully collected from the Classics, whose very expressions have, as nearly as possible, been faithfully transcribed, and the passages referred to correctly quote ed. When the fact is curious or important, the quotations are more numerous. The greatest care has been used to omit nothing which might serve to illustrate any passage in a classic author ; and in this part of the work in particular, the compiler has frequently had his labour repaid, by accidentally meeting with explanations or illustrations of many passages, which he never before understood. For a more ample account of several particulars in ancient mythology, on which he has been very short, he refers the reader to Lempriere's Classical Dictionary, to Natalis Comes, and other larger works on that subject; for a fuller description of the antiquities of Greece, to the Travels of Anacharsis, by the Abbé Barthelemi, and to Potter's Greck Antiquities; concerning ancient geography in general, to Cellarius, Cluverius, and D'Anville.

It was originally inten ded to insert proper maps, both ancient and modern, which are highly requisite in a work of this kind ; but the book has swelled to so great a fize, that this has bien found impracticable. It is therefore proposed to print the maps separately, in such a form, that they may serve as a small Atlas, at a mo. derate price. But as they are not yet ready, it must in the mean time be left to the bookseller to furnish the best he can procure.

therefore

That the work might be included in one volume, it has been judged proper to print a great deal of important matter in the manner of notes; which, it is hoped, will be found no lefs accurately compiled than if they had been to appear in the most splendid form. The great object has been, to condense as much useful information as possible within moderate bounds. The compiler imagines, that in another volume a pretty accurate though brief account might be given of all the most important facts of ancient and modern bistory, and of every thing most curious in every country of the globe. A small abridgement, containing merely what is requisite for the learner to commit to memory, may perhaps by some be deemed necessary: if so, it may be easily accomplished; and if any number of teachers fignify their defire, the compiler will execute it to the beit of his ability. But with regard to the additional volume, it must be a work of time. And he now means, if the public approve of his present attempt, to direct his attention to another undertaking, in which he has already made considerable progress, the compiling of a short but comprehensive Latin and English Dictionary, upon a new plan. He was led to think of this, by his having found cause, in compiling both the present work and the Roman Antiquities, to depart in many words from the interpretation given of them by Ainiworth, and all the other Latin and English dictionaries he has met with. He has a further inducement to prosecute this undertaking, that the researches to which it must naturally lead him, will afford the best means of improving both this and his former works.

He again begs leave to entreat the encouragers of learning, that, if they discover any mistake, or can fug

ance.

gest any improvement, they will have the goodness to communicate it to him. He hopes the industry he has bestowed, and the evident intention of his labours, will dispose every one who wishes to promote the improvement of youth, to favour him with advice and aslift

The testimonies of approbation he has received from several of the first literary characters in the kingdom, and the favourable reception which the Roman Antiquities have met with from the public in general, have encouraged him to enlarge the plan of the present work, and to exert his utmost diligence in improving it, that he might at least thew how highly he values the honour they have done him. He will confider himself happy, if his efforts shall be thought to merit the continuance of their elteem.

The editions of the classics, which have been consulted in this work, are molily the fame with those mentioned in the Roman Antiquities; Cæsar, by Clarke, or in uluin Delphini; Pliny, by Brotier; Quinctilian, and the writers on husbandry, by Gefner; Quintus Curtius, by Pitiscus ; Dionysius of Halicarnassus, by Reiske; Diodorus Siculus, by Wedelingius; Plustarch's Morals, by Xylander; Lio Cassius, by Reimai us'; Apoliodorus, by Heyne ; Pausanias, by Kuhnius; Sirabo, (who has most of all been consulted), by Walters, where the divisions eferred to are marked on the margin of the page; Aliure, by Perizonius ; Scriptores Mythographi Latini, by-guftinus van Staveren, &c. It is needless to mention the editionis of such authors as are always divided in the same manner.

EDINBURGH,
15th May 1794.

CON

Ć O N T E N T S.

Page.

I

IGURE and Motion of the EARTH,

of the PLANETS, DESCRIPTION of the TERRESTRIAL GLOBE, Manner of finding the LATITUDE and LONGITUDE,

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II

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HISTORICAL Account of the Progress and Improvements

of ASTRONOMY and GEOGRAPHY to the time of SIR ISAAC NEWTON, Principles of the NEWTONIAN PHILOSOPHY, casionally compared with the OPINIONS of the AN

35 I. GENERAL PROPERTIES of MATTER,

ib. II. PARTICULAR PROPERTIES of MATTER,

41 MAGNETISM and ELECTRICITY,

ib.
PROPERTIES of the AIR,
HEAT and its EFFECTS,
EVAPORATION,

49
CLOUDS, RAIN, SPRINGS, &c.
EARTHQUAKES and VOLCANOS,
COLD and its EFFECTS,

53 CONGELATION,

54 WINDS,

55

42 48

50

52

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First PRINCIPLES of GEOMETRY,

The HEAVENLY BODIES,
1. The PLANETS and their SATELLITES,
II. The Fixed STARS,
The CELESTIAL GLOBE,

71 76 ib. 87 92

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