Life of Sir John Franklin and the North-west Passage

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G. Philip & Sons, 1891 - 324 pages
 

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Page 77 - Oh, who can tell, save he whose heart hath tried, And danced in triumph o'er the waters wide, The exulting sense - the pulse's maddening play, That thrills the wanderer of that trackless way?
Page 94 - Trent), and formed a complete casing to the planks, which received an additional layer at each plunge of the vessel. So great, indeed, was the accumulation about the bows, that we were obliged to cut it away repeatedly with axes to relieve the bowsprit from the enormous weight that was attached to it ; and the ropes were so thickly covered with ice, that it was necessary to beat them with large sticks to keep them in a state of readiness for any evolution that might be rendered necessary, either...
Page 147 - We now, therefore, witnessed for the first time the curious phenomenon of the directive power of the needle becoming so weak as to be completely overcome by the attraction of the ship ; so that the needle might now be properly said to point to the north pole of the ship.
Page 184 - The only difficulty I had was to get Sir John to shorten sail when it was wanted. He is full of life and energy, with good judgment and a capital memory, — one of the best I know. His conversation is delightful, and most instructive ; and of all men he is the most fitted for the command of an enterprise requiring sound sense and great perseverance. I have learnt much from him, and consider myself most fortunate in being with such a man ; and he is full of benevolence and kindness withal.
Page v - And smiles on glorious fate. To live with fame The gods allow to many; but to die With equal lustre is a blessing Heaven Selects from all the choicest boons of fate. And with a sparing hand on few bestows.
Page 195 - September, 1846. The officers and crews, consisting of 105 souls, under the command of Captain FRM Crozier, landed here in lat. 69° 37' 42
Page 189 - W., having wintered in 1846-7 at Beechey Island in latitude 74° 43' 28" N.— longitude 91° 39' 15" W., after having ascended Wellington Channel to latitude 77° and returned by the West side of Cornwallis Island. Sir John Franklin commanding the expedition. All well.
Page 195 - Ross' pillar has not however been found, and the paper has been transferred to this position which is that in which Sir J. Ross...
Page 237 - BROTHER OFFICERS AND FAITHFUL COMPANIONS WHO HAVE SUFFERED AND PERISHED IN THE CAUSE OF SCIENCE AND THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY. THIS TABLET IS ERECTED NEAR THE SPOT WHERE THEY PASSED THEIR FIRST ARCTIC WINTER, AND WHENCE THEY ISSUED FORTH TO CONQUER DIFFICULTIES OR TO DIE. IT COMMEMORATES THE GRIEF OF THEIR ADMIRING COUNTRYMEN AND FRIENDS, AND THE ANGUISH SUBDUED BY FAITH, OF HER WHO HAS LOST, IN THE HEROIC LEADER OF THE EXPEDITION, THE MOST DEVOTED AND AFECTIONATE OF HUSBANDS. " And so HE bringeth...
Page 38 - ... bludgeons became too strong to be resisted. Those who have seen a farmyard well stocked with pigs, calves, sheep, oxen, and with two or three litters of puppies with their mothers in it, and have heard them all in tumult together, may form a good idea of the confused noise of the seals at Cone Point. The sailors killed as many of these harmless and not unamiable creatures as they were able to skin during the time necessary for me to take the requisite angles, and we then left the poor affrighted...

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