Parochial Antiquities Attempted in the History of Ambrosden: Burcester, and Other Adjacent Parts in the Counties of Oxford and Bucks

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Clarendon Press, 1818 - 9 pages
 

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Page 10 - ... parts, which before lay remote from common notice, and in few years had been buried in unsearchable oblivion. If the present age be too much immersed in cares or pleasures, to take any relish, or to make any use of these discoveries ; I then appeal to posterity : for I believe the times will come, when persons of better inclination will arise, who will be glad to find any collection of this nature ; and will be ready to supply the defects, and carry on the continuation of it.
Page 5 - Parochial Antiquities Attempted in the History of Ambrosden, Burcester, and other Adjacent Parts in the Counties of Oxford and Bucks.
Page 440 - In this manner was the illegitimate birth of most impropriations. The lay patrons devoutly, and, as they thought, innocently, resigned their right of presentation to religious houses ; and they, by their interest and money, procured from the Popes an annexion of the tithes to themselves, with an arbitrary portion, or a 308 36Í) poor settled reserve, to a servant of theirs whom they should call a vicar.
Page 325 - Warwick, who died very aged, 1300, "was so great a friend to the University of Oxford, that she caused a common chest to be made, and did put into it two hundred and twenty marks ; out of which such as were poor scholars might upon security at any time borrow something gratis for supply of their wants ; in consideration whereof, the University were obliged to celebrate certain masses every year in Saint Mary's Church. Which chest was in being in Edward IV.'s time, and called by the name of Warwick...
Page 513 - Seest thou the church of England, heretofore honourable and free, enslaved by Romish oppressions, and the king's unjust exactions? Seest thou the common people impoverished by tributes and taxes, and from the condition of freemen, reduced to servitude? Seest thou the nobility, formerly venerable through Christendom, vilified by aliens, in their own native country? I therefore charge...
Page 303 - And to the intent that learned men may hereafter spring the more for the execution of the premises, every parson, vicar, clerk or beneficed man within this deanery, having yearly to dispend, in benefices and other promotions of the Church, an...
Page 12 - ... turns of presentation, he referred the choice of fit persons to the sole judgment of the bishop, and by such deference did his lordship and himself most particular honour ? And how will it please them to be put in remembrance of a great many other good and glorious actions, which I might now foretell, and they will hereafter find completed ? • And I have the vanity to hope, that some of those who shall succeed in the benefice I now enjoy, will be glad to recollect, that they had a certain predecessor,...
Page xvii - ... the notices of our own nations, do deserve and well reward the pains of any English student ; will make him understand the state of former ages, the constitution of governments, the fundamental reasons of equity and law, the rise and succession of doctrines and opinions, the original of ancient and composition of modern tongues, the tenures of property, the maxims of policy, the rites of religion, the characters of virtue and vice, and indeed the nature of mankind. I wish the excellent parts...
Page 87 - Villans of every village, were to enquire into the name of the place, who held it in the time of King Edward, who was the present possessor, how many hides in the Manor, how many...
Page 25 - Deddington in this county, only with strong staves, which violently bringing about the bag of sand, if they make not good speed away, it strikes them in the neck or shoulders, and sometimes knocks them off their horses ; the great design of this sport being to try the agility both of horse and man, and to break the board. It is now...

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