Trial and Acquittal of Lyman Beecher, D.D.: Before the Presbytery of Cincinnati, on Charges Preferred by Joshua L. Wilson, D.D.

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Eli Taylor, 1835 - 107 pages
 

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Page 30 - From this original corruption, whereby we are utterly indisposed, disabled, and made opposite to all good, and wholly inclined to all evil, do proceed all actual transgressions.
Page 66 - See, I have set before thee this day life and good, and death and evil, in that I command thee this day to love the LORD thy God, to walk in His ways, and to keep His commandments, and His statutes, and His judgments, that thou mayest live and multiply : and the LORD thy God shall bless thee in the land whither thou goest to possess it.
Page 66 - I call heaven and earth to record this day against you, that I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing : therefore choose life, that both thou and thy seed may live...
Page 10 - They being the root of all mankind, the guilt of this sin was IMPUTED, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature conveyed to all their posterity descending from them by ordinary generation.
Page 28 - Thy will be done in earth as it is in heaven," we pray, that God by his grace would make us able and willing to know, obey, and submit to his will in all things, as the angels do in heaven. Q. 104. What do we pray for in the fourth petition ? A. In the fourth petition, which is, "Give us this day our daily bread...
Page 28 - Hallowed be thy name," we pray, that God would enable us and others to glorify him in all that whereby he maketh himself known, and that he would dispose all things to his own glory. Q,. 102. What do we pray for in the second petition? A. In the second petition, which is,
Page 30 - No mere man, since the fall, is able in this life, perfectly to keep the commandments of God, but doth daily break them in thought, word, and deed.
Page 28 - Man by his fall into a state of sin, hath wholly lost all ability of will to any spiritual good accompanying salvation, so as a natural man being altogether averse from that good, and dead in sin, is not able by his own strength to convert himself, or to prepare himself thereunto.

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