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We regret that Mr. Hoare has not superintended the press. At p. 19 we read of Praxeas, Nætus, and Beryllus,'—at p. 54 we find Nestorius advanced before the Catholic Church, and the ' Eutycheans' enjoying the same preference. This work is founded a good deal on Dean Waddington's Ecclesiastical History.

Mr. Pott's 'Confirmation Lectures, preached at Cuddesden,' (Masters,) are above the average.

"Oremus,’ (Rivingtons,) we fear, is a collection below the average even of religious verses.

M. Cely Trevilian, Esq.-is the second name the archaic form of silly?has, in his ' Examination of the sign x&s, Rev. xiii, 18,'(Binns and Goodwin,) discovered the Beast of the Apocalypse in Louis Napoleon. 666, we are assured, means 6,000,000; but the President was elected by six millions; therefore the President is the Beast. Q.E.D. Not content with this notable discovery, Mr. Tr vilian goes further : very tantalizing way, after ing so satisfactorily disposed of XÉs, he assures us that after all the sign is not x65 but ges=60.10.6., which looks very like 76. But this would not suit Mr. Trevilian, who wanted to juggle 1066 out of it, which, by some cabalistical process, he says means Louis Napoleon. But how to get 1066 out of 60. 10. 6.? Why, says Mr. Trevilian, by making the middle figure the most important; just as over'a shop door, you read Silversmith Payne Jeweller,' p. 17. Actually all this is in print; and as a clincher to the argument, the prominence given to the figure 10 signifies the 10 May. We commit arithmetic and numerical sigus to Mr. Trevilian : the truths of numbers can avenge themselves : to be told that six hundred is only a form of six millions requires no reprobation. But why should Mr. 'Trevilian play cabalistical tricks with grammar and the doctrine of gender : cannot he leave the poor Graces alone? why does he talk of (p. 27):

• Vultus non omnibus una?' We can hardly keep pace with the publications which multiply upon us, upon the engrossing question of Synodical action, and the admission of the lay element into Church assemblies; that both these subjects may be discussed with temper and judgment, is our sincere wish. But since at the present moment even the expression of opinion has its dangers, we content ourselves with announcing, 1, ‘Synodal Action necessary to the Church :' a letter to Mr. Gladstone, by Mr. Caswall, (Mozley.) 2. “Suggestions for practically carrying out the Principle of Lay Cooperation in the Synods of the Scottish Church,' (Aberdeen : Brown.) 3. ' The Law, Constitution, and Reform of Convocation,' (J. H. Parker.) 4. “Some Objections to the Revival of Ecclesiastical Synods answered, by Mr. G. D. Wheeler,' in a University Sermon, (J. H. Parker.) 5. • Church Synods the Institution of Christ,' a Sermon preached in York Minster, by Mr. George Trevor, (Bell.) 6. Archdeacon Sinclair's Charge' (Rivingtons,) against Synodal action. 7. “The Appeal to Convocation :' Archdeacon Wilberforce's Charge, (Murray.)

Mr. W. R. Scott, a name new to us, has printed a very promising pamphlet, “A reply to Mr. Goode,' (Masters) on the necessity of the Episcopal question. Archdeacon Churton and Mr. Harington have left something yet to glean in this field of discussion; and Mr. W. B. Flower, in his 'NonEpiscopal Orders: a Letter to Mr. Goode,' (Masters,) on the same subject, has completed the discussion with vigour and freeness. Mr. Goode,

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nothing daunted, and always ready to pick a quarrel with everybody, and to take for a personality every hint at heterodoxy, advertises a • Letter to Sir W.P. Wood, on the acceptance of the Prayer Book in a non-natural sense.' The assertion was general enough: has Mr. Goode his especial reasons for making the taunt a personal one?

To Mr. Jebb we are indebted for an earnest Plea for what is left of the Cathedrals, &c.'(Rivingtons.) It was directly called out by Lord Blandford's Bill: but the occasion or the necessity for some such protest has not passed away. The fate of capitular corporations is curious enough. When, ten or twenty years ago, Church Reform was the order of the day, Churchmen saw that the only hope for the Chapters was in making them useful. This purpose has been defeated from that day to this by those who are now most clamorous against Cathedrals. If it was the policy of the Whigs to destroy Cathedrals and stalls by filling them with unworthy incumbents, they have gone far to succeed.

• What are the best Means of Reclaiming our lost Population ? (Leeds : Harrison,) is the authoritative Report of Suggestions made by the Leeds Clergy on the division of services, and other practical measures, which, when first made, attracted much attention, and, in some not unnecessary particulars, much criticism.

Specimens of Old Indian Poetry,' translated from the Sanskrit, by Mr. Griffith, Boden Scholar, (Hall, Virtue & Co.) is the work of one who is a perfect master of metre and language. If, as we have no reason to doubt, its fidelity is equal to its force and English style, we may pronounce

Mr. Griffith’s ‘Specimens' a distinct and important contribution to English literature.

• The Emphatic New Testament,' by Mr. John Taylor, (Taylor, Walton & Co.) is an attempt to mark the emphasis and relative value of each word by a system of corresponding differences in type. Practically this amounts to a kind of pictorial commentary; since it is obvious that interpretation turns on emphasis. In proportion to the skill displayed in the execution of this task-and we are not disparaging the pains bestowed on it—are the controversial difficulties which it involves. The obvious objection to the principle of such a work is, that it confines the sense to a single emphasis ;-ex. grat. The Lord's Prayer: everybody feels that one of the blessings belonging to this prayer is the variety and succession of emphases—that is, of successive and parallel senses and applications of which it admits. Mr. Taylor's attempt, of course, practically excludes all meanings but one.

Perhaps the most important book of the quarter is Mr. Cleveland Coxe's 'Sympathies of the Continent, or Proposals for a New Reformation,' (J. H. Parker.) The body of this work consists of a translation of Hirscher's • Present Crisis of the Church,' with parallel illustrations from contemporaneous French and Italian works. Dr. Hirscher is a Roman Catholic, a dignitary of Freiburg, Breisgau, and a writer of large and European reputation. His proposition is for another Reformation: he goes very deeply into the practical necessities of the Church, especially those arising from its separation from the State. But we may perhaps state the drift of the work best in its author's own words: A third point to which the Church • must direct its immediate attention, is the satisfaction of that general

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desire, which is prevalent, for certain reforms. This desire is of long standing, and very familiar to us. What is wanted is, for example, an improvement in the worship of the Church; a revision of its liturgical • formularies; the translation of the Liturgy into the vulgar tongue; com'munion in both kinds; the reform of the confessional; the simplification . of ceremonies, and such like changes. So too we need an amelioration • of the ecclesiastical discipline; the abolition of the forced celibacy of

priests; and the revision of certain ecclesiastical obligations. We need • further improvements, for example, in the Table of Lessons, and a greater ' variety in the selections from the Gospels and Epistles. We need eman

cipation from that tyranny which imposes upon the faithful, as Catholic • doctrine, matters which have never been settled by the Church. Finally, . we require reforms in the constitution of the Church; the revival of Synodal institutions; and the proportionate participation of Clergy and Laity in the affairs of the Church.'-- Pp. 180—182.

To these points Dr. Hirscher subsequently adds, p. 209, masses for the dead; p. 211, indulgences; p. 216, abuses connected with confraternities and special devotions; p. 220, the cultus of the saints, &c. These are the practical matters which one so distinguished in the German Church feels bound to call attention to: these abuses, he says, must be remedied; must be remedied in Synod; and in this Synod Laymen must have a voice. But why does the present time so imperatively call for this reform? Because the Church is thrown on its own resources: the Church must develop its own life: the State when connected exercised a reforming influence; that being withdrawn, the Church must supply its own corrective tendencies; especially must the laity discharge, in the Church and for the Church, those functions which hitherto the State performed ab extra. Thus, according to Dr. Hirscher, it seems that the new development of lay influence depends upon the separation of the Church from the State. In these views Dr. Hirscher is by no means singular: it is known that he represents a large class. Lately the German Bishops in Synod all but arrived at some reforming resolution. In France in Italy-even in South America, the same spirit is at work. These are certainly signs of a reformation of Rornanism from within, and of a direct upheaving of the spiritual life of the Church by its own power: as such they deserve the utmost attention from ourselves. And the striking similarity of the circumstances with our own, on such subjects as clerical education, schools, and the voluntary offerings of the people, towards which Dr. Hirscher directs his especial attention, makes this work very applicable to ourselves. There is hardly one of the subjects of the day mooted among ourselves which is not illustrated by Dr. Hirscher. We commend this volume to general and immediate attention.

In a long and able Introduction, Mr. Coxe draws out the general and diffused 'Sympathies of the Continent' in the reforming direction; and he takes occasion to clear away some objections and misunderstandings connected with his own-the American-Church. We select a passage which sufficiently indicates the spirit in which Mr. Coxe has treated his subject :

• “If ever Christians re-unite, as all things make it their interest to do, it * would seem that the movement must take its rise in the Church of Eng* land. ... . She is most precious, and may be considered as one of those

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chemical intermèdes, which are capable of producing a union between elements dissociable in themselves.” So wrote the Count de Maistre, a • close observer of the Continental Protestants, and of the Russo-Greek • Church; but one of the most bigoted Ultramontanists that ever strove to

make the worse appear the better reason in behalf of Rome! Perhaps he • said it “not of himself.” It was written before the present century • opened, and what sign of such a movement existed then? But now, when . we find "deep calling unto deep"—religious movement characterising the • whole Church; and all that is not unreal and re-actionary, setting towards one result, it becomes England and English Christians to recognise this noble mission of their Church. Is not the movement which now agitates her, the expected beginning of better things for the world? It is certainly • a Catholic movement in its spirit and tendencies, and coincides with that " which has been already characterised, as it exists in Hirscher. It sets

not towards Rome; but, far beyond Rome and Mediævalism, it seeks "after the primitive and the pure. So far from being papal, it is, in a good • sense, popular. While Mediævalism runs counter to all the habits and

principles of the English race, wherever it is found, this movement, like • Hirscher's, seeks to meet the wants and instincts of men in society, and ' to adapt itself to the condition of the world. Instead of isolating the

priesthood, and keeping the laity at a distance, it breathes the genuine * spirit of ancient Catholicity, in its philanthropy, its sympathy for the • masses, and its desire to employ the mighty energies of the people in • honourable services and holy undertakings. With all its divine right and

high conservatism, it yet understands the popular element, and knows • how to produce harmonious action between it, and what is exclusively « sacerdotal. It is impossible that this movement should not be highly

popular with Englishmen, when once it is purified from the obloquy and • the defilement which have befallen it, through the morbid enthusiasm of • some who have shared its earliest and most dangerous excitements.'-Pp. 48-50.

• The Eclipse of Faith,' (Longman,) is a very remarkable book. It is a reply-and an adequate reply—to Mr. Francis Newman's recent Phases of Faith :' and to the mysticism of the new school of spiritualizing infidelity. The argument is conducted with great skill, it combines the true Socratic irony with the Socratic dialogue. There is wit, too, as well as wisdom in the discussion : and though the writer-Mr. Rogers, of the · Edinburgh Review'-holds views different on many important matters from our own, we must award him the honour of a distinguished defence of revelation in the present work—a work in which depth of thought is relieved by great clearness and force of style.

We sympathise with the purpose of the series of Tracts proposed on • The Restoration of Belief,' (Cambridge: Macmillan,) and, as far as the first number brings them out, with the immediate objects and method of their writers. But we cannot reconcile ourselves to a more decisive commendation of what is necessarily, at present, so undeveloped.

• Evenings at Sackville College,' (Masters,) announces its character. It is a collection of Legends for Children.' To this there would be no objection were all the narratives simply fictitious, but they lay claim to various degrees of credibility: and the last, by way of contrast,' is the Bedminster

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Coal-pit accident. It is unquestionably true that the writer gives notice that he does not demand the same amount or character of belief to all his narratives: but it argues more critical powers than children have, or ought to have, when we expect them to distinguish between this fact, a few months old, and the story of 'S. Sebaldus and the Icicles.' We may tell a child that legends are not true: but to read them from the Times newspaper would be somewhat perplexing.

We have only just received the same active writer's • Lectures on Church Difficulties,’ (Masters.) We have, however, seen enough of them to pronounce them both lively and vigorous, and, as far as we have read, entirely sound disquisitions on the subjects of the day.' They are written in a free flowing way; with terse and apt illustration : and if they occasionally verge on the familiar, it must be remembered that few or none were delivered in public. The disquisition on Sermons struck as forcibly,

Mr. Johns' • History of Spain, for Children,’ (Masters) perhaps not improperly, lays no claim to historical criticism. We have the old stories of Count Julian and Don Roderick, and of the Cid, which are probably as true as those of Tarpeia and Curtius. However, it is all pleasant enough to read: and we would not deprive children of their sweets. Niebuhrism has made history dull work for young folks.

Miss Fourdrinier's 'Our New Parish,' (Pickering,) without having a very ambitious aim, hits its mark: and to say this is considerable praise. The plan of this little work is to illustrate the first of each of the Church Services celebrated in a new church by some appropriate tale: the stories have point and are carefully written. But their length often outweighs the incidents. The Church and its appointments; its once a month Communions, and apparently its once a week prayers, demanded and have produced a level, and perhaps common-place series of annals. Under better circumstances the authoress had very likely produced a better work.

To those, and we believe they are many, who admire the 'Tales of Kirkbeck,' another volume, Our Doctor,' &c. (Masters,) will be an agreeable present. It is equal to its predecessors: and if we do not pronounce a glowing eulogium, it is because, as we have often said, this class of fictions directly religious is not to our taste. We have never yet reconciled either our theological or literary sympathies with them. The writer is very prolific—too much so, we think, for a lasting reputation. Another story, 'a domestic tale,' is announced from the same hand. The substance of our distaste to this class of books is summed up well enough in a passage which we have lighted upon in a remarkable work, which we have not read, but which we intend to read, “Reminiscences of Thought and Feeling. •George the Fourth's Queen Caroline,' and we own to be astounded at our ally, 'observed in her broken English when somebody offered her a religious novel, and which she declined to peruse,"If I • have no-velle, let me have no-velle, and if I have ser-mone, let me have

ser-mone, but don't let me have both at once;" and there was great justice, as well as shrewdness, in the remark.'

Messrs. Davies and Vaughan, Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge, have printed a “Translation of Plato's Republic, (Macmillan.) Under such antecedents, it is almost superfluous to announce a sound and scholarly version. It is more: it is, and a rare virtue in classical transla

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