The Monthly Review of Medicine and Pharmacy, Volume 3

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Keasbey & Mattison, 1880
 

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Page 60 - ... being poured in slowly* until the level of the liquid just reaches the point of the gauge which is fixed in the cup. In warm weather the temperature of the room in which the samples to be tested have been kept should be observed in the first instance, and if it exceeds 65...
Page 60 - The heating vessel or water-bath is filled by pouring water into the funnel until it begins to flow out at the spout of the vessel. The temperature of the water at the commencement of the test is to be 130...
Page 223 - The common practice in making poultices, of mixing the linseed meal with hot water, and applying them directly to the skin, is quite wrong, because, if we do not wish to burn the patient, we must wait until a great portion of the heat has been lost. The proper method is to take a flannel bag (the size of the poultice required), to fill this with the linseed poultice as hot as it can possibly be made, and to put between this and the skin a second piece of flannel, so that there shall be at least two...
Page 230 - And dieted, much to their friends' surprise, On pickles and pencils and chalk and coals. So fast their little hearts did bound, The frightened insects buzzed the more; So over all their chests he found The rale sibilant and rale sonore.
Page 230 - THERE was a young man in Boston town He bought him a STETHOSCOPE nice and new. All mounted and finished and polished down, With an ivory cap and a stopper too. It happened a spider within did crawl, And spun him a web of ample size, Wherein there chanced one day to fall A couple of very imprudent flies. The first was a bottle-fly, big and blue, The second was smaller, and thin and long; So there was a concert between the two, Like an octave flute and a tavern gong.
Page iv - German make, while, by avoiding the expenses of importation, it is afforded at less than half the price of the foreign article. The Malt from which" it is made is obtained by carefully malting the very best quality of selected Toronto (Canada) Barley. The Extract is prepared by an improved process, which prevents injury to its properties or flavor by excess of heat. It represents the soluble Constituents of Malt and Hops viz : Malt Sugar, Dextrine, Diastase, Resin and Bitter of Hops, Phosphates ,of...
Page 365 - RESIN and BITTER of HOPS, PHOSPHATES Of LIME and MAGNESIA, and ALKALINE SALTS. Attention is invited to the following analysis of this Extract, as given by S. H. Douglas, Professor of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. TROMMER EXTRACT...
Page 60 - ... is filled as usual, but also with cold water. The lamp is then placed under the apparatus and kept there during the entire operation. If a very heavy oil is being dealt with, the operation may be commenced with water previously heated to 120, instead...
Page 317 - ... in water, before meals. If the headache be immediately above the eyebrows, the acid is best ; but if it be a little higher up, just where the hair begins, the soda appears to be the most effectual. At the same time the headache is removed, the feeling of sleepiness and weariness, which frequently leads the patients to complain that they rise. up more tired than they lie down generally disappears.
Page 365 - Diastase renders it most effective in those forms of disease originating in imperfect digestion of the starchy elements of food. A single dose of the Improved Trommer's Extract of Malt, contains a larger quantity of the active properties of Malt, than a pint of the best ale or porter ; and not having undergone fermentation, is absolutely free from alcohol and carbonic acid. The dose for adults is from' a desert to a tablespoonful three times daily.

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