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THE BRITISH EMPIRE SERIES

VOL. I

KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRÜBNER & CO. LTD

NEW PUBLICATIONS.

THE BRITISH EMPIRE SERIES.

In Five Volumes, with Twelve Maps. Large post 8vo.

VOL. I.-INDIA, Ceylon, Straits Settlements, British North

Borneo, Hong-Kong. Two Maps.
VOL. II.-BRITISH AFRICA. Four Maps.
VOL. III.-BRITISH AMERICA. Two Maps.
VOL. IV.-AUSTRALASIA. Two Maps,
VOL. V.--GENERAL SURVEY. Two Maps.

The Volumes will be issued successively at intervals of about one month.

FIRST STEPS IN INTERNATIONAL LAW. By Sir GEORGE

SHERATON BAKER, Bart., of Lincoln's Inn, Recorder of Bideford and Barnstaple, Author of " Laws relating to Quarantine," and Translator and Editor of "Halleck's International Law." Demy 8vo. 108. Bat.

THE WOLSELEY SERIES OF MILITARY WORKS.

Edited by Captain W. H. JAMES, late R. E.

NEW VOLUMES. I'niform. Demy 8vo. THE CONDUCT OF WAR. By Baron von der Goltz. 108. 6d. CROMWELL AS A SOLDIER. By Major Baldock, R.A.

With Twelve Maps and Plans. NAPOLEON AS A GENERAL. By Count YORCK VON

WARTENBURG. Two Vols. GOURKO'S RAID. By Colonel EPAUCHIN, of the Russian Staff.

158.

LONDON : PATERNOSTER House, Charing Cross Road, W.C.

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LONDON
KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRÜBNER & CO. LTD

PATERNOSTER HOUSE, CHARING CROSS ROAD

The rights of translation and of reproduction are reserved

Printed by BALLANTYNE, HANSON & Co.

At the Ballantyne Press

PREFATORY NOTE

The papers comprised in these volumes were most of them given originally as lectures in the Sunday Afternoon Course at the South Place Institute, Finsbury, from 1895 to 1898, with the object of affording trustworthy information concerning the various colonies, settlements, and countries scattered over the world which go to form the whole known as “The British Empire.” It was thought that a wider and deeper knowledge of the growth, present condition, and possibilities of each integral part of our Empire would tend to strengthen the sympathetic, material, and political ties which unite the colonies to the mother country.

The generous response to the invitation to lecture was very gratifying; travellers, natives, and those to whom had been given the onerous task of governing the various provinces of our Empire, vied with one another in their willingness to impart the special knowledge which they had acquired.

The lecturers were asked, when possible, to give a short account of the country prior to its incorporation, its colonial history, the effect of the British connection on the country and the natives, and the outlook for the future. To these topics were added the conditions for colonisation, of trade and commerce, the state and local government, and the laws of the country, especi

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