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the annoyance and pressure of the mob. The moniously and touchingly written. The "World poet took his seat accordingly; and it was, no before the Flood," which appeared in 1812, is doubt, a proud triumph to his feelings. perhaps the least popular of his productions. During this imprisonment it was that he wrote In this work his wonted piety and the effects of his poems entitled "Prison Amusements," though his early education strongly appear, while he he did not publish them until 1797. In the has introduced various enlivening incidents to prison he was well accommodated, and had every break the uniformity of the subject. Since this indulgence afforded him; a large yard supplied poem, "Greenland," "The Pelican Island," and him with an airy promenade. He is also said numerous occasional pieces, have dropped from to have amused himself in composing a work his pen. His thoughts are all remarkable for of some bulk of a humorous character, but which their purity. He is the poet of religion and has not seen the light. He went to Scarborough morality. His political principles are those of a for the benefit of his health, as soon as he was free Englishman.

liberated. This happened in July 1796, his In person, Montgomery is below the middle health having been much affected by anxiety height, and of slender frame; his complexion and imprisonment. It was from a visit to the fair, and hair yellow. His limbs are well prosame place subsequently, that he composed his portioned, There is a cast of melancholy over his poem of "The Ocean" in 1805. It was singular features, unless when they are lighted up by conthat the author of the "Prison Amusements" versation, and then his eyes show all the fire of should have suffered that and other published genius. In manner he is singularly modest and works to sleep from want of making them more unobtrusive, especially among strangers. It is known-he allowed them to drop into complete only in intercourse with his friends that he oblivion. In 1806 appeared "The Wanderer of opens with a power and eloquence which few Switzerland," which, in spite of a severe criti- would expect of him. Though kind and amiable, cism in the Edinburgh Review, conferred upon he can wound keenly by wit and sarcasm in him great and deserved celebrity. It was not argument, but it is without a tincture of ill-nauntil then that he took his station among the ture, and he generally conveys himself the cure better order of his country's poets. It is said for the wounds he inflicts, by the kindness with he was on the point of publishing another poem which he winds up his conclusions. As a poet, in preference, which has not yet been given to he ranks only in the second class of British living the world, though nearly ready for the press at writers. He never falls low, and rarely rises high; the time "The Wanderer of Switzerland" ap- his character may be designated as that of the peared. Mr. Bowyer printed Montgomery's next calm river, rather than the romantic torrent; work, "The West Indies," in a most expensive but his course is peculiarly his own. He is very form, with superb embellishments: nearly ten little of an imitator, and deserves immortal eulogy, thousand copies of the different editions were in that he has written no line sold. The humane feelings of the author appear to predominate in this work; it is har.

which dying he could wish to blot.

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1 St. Gothard is the name of the highest mountain in the can

ton of Uri, the birth-place of Swiss independence.

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2 On the plains of Morgarthen, where the Swiss gained their first decisive victory over the force of Austria, and thereby secured the independence of their country; Aloys Reding, at the head of the troops of the little cantons, Uri, Schwitz, and Underwalden, repeatedly repulsed the invading army of France.

"In the valley of their birth,
Where our guardian mountains stand;
In the eye of heaven and earth,
Met the warriors of our land.

3 By the resistance of these small cantons, the French General Schawenbourg was compelled to respect their independence, and gave them a solemn pledge to that purport; but no sooner had they disarmed, on the faith of this engagement, than the enemy came suddenly upon them with an immense force; and with threats of extermination compelled them to take the civic oath to the new constitution, imposed upon all Switzerland. 4 The inhabitants of the Lower Valley of Underwalden alone

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1 Brunnen, at the foot of the mountains, on the borders of the

Lake of Uri, where the first Swiss Patriots, Walter Furst of resisted the French message, which required submission to the Uri, Werner Stauffacher of Schwitz, and Arnold of Melchtal | new constitution, and the immediate surrender, alive or dead, of in Underwalden, conspired against the tyranny of Austria in nine of their leaders. When the demand, accompanied by a 1307, again in 1798, became the seat of the Diet of these three menace of destruction, was read in the Assembly of the District, forest cantons. all the men of the Valley, fifteen hundred in number, took up arms, and devoted themselves to perish in the ruins of their country.

1 At the battle of Sempach, the Austrians presented so impenetrable a front with their projected spears, that the Swiss were repeatedly compelled to retire from the attack, till a native of Underwalden, named Arnold de Winkelried, commending his family to his countrymen, sprung upon the enemy, and burying as many of their spears as he could grasp in his body, made a breach in their line; the Swiss rushed in, and routed the Austrians with a terrible slaughter.

2 Many of the Underwalders, on the approach of the French army, removed their families and cattle among the Higher Alps; and themselves returned to join their brethren, who had en

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1 The French made their first attack on the valley of Underwalden from the Lake: but, after a desperate conflict, they were victoriously repelled, and two of their vessels, containing five hundred men, perished in the engagement.

2 In the last and decisive battle, the Underwalders were overcamped in their native Valley, on the borders of the Lake, and powered by two French armies, which rushed upon them from awaited the attack of the enemy. the opposite mountains, and surrounded their camp, while an assault, at the same time, was made upon them from the Lake.

1 The Capital of Underwalden.

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