The Prince and the Pedlar, Or, The Siege of Bristol, Volume 3

Front Cover
R. Bentley, 1839
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 136 - And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know you and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is, and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia.
Page 136 - Pray, do not mock me : I am a very foolish fond old man, Fourscore and upward, not an hour more nor less; And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful: for I am mainly ignorant What place this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night.
Page 269 - My nobile leige!" goode CANYNGE sayde, "Leave justice to our Godde, And laye the yronne rule asyde; Be thyne the olyve rodde." "Was Godde to serche our hertes and reines, The best were synners grete; CHRIST'S vycarr only knowes ne synne, Ynne alle thys mortall state.
Page 270 - CANYNGE, awaie! thys traytour vile Has scorn'd my power and mee; Howe canst thou thenne for such a manne Intreate my clemencye?" "My nobile leige! the trulie brave Wylle val'rous actions prize, Respect a brave and nobile mynde, Altho
Page 295 - For sith men would that women should Be meek to them each one; Much more ought they to God obey, And serve but Him alone.
Page 42 - Now nay, now nay, thou lady faire, The court is full of subtiltie ; And if I goe to the court, lady, Never more I may thee see." " Yet goe to the court, my lord...
Page 99 - HE It standeth so, — a dede is do Whereof grete harme shall growe: My destiny is for to dy A shamefull deth, I trowe; Or elles to fle: the one must be. None other way I knowe, But to withdrawe as an outlawe, And take me to my bowe. Wherfore, adue, my owne hart true! None other rede I can; For I must to the grene wode go Alone, a banyshed man.
Page 42 - How long shall fortune faile me nowe, And harrowe me with fear and dread ? How long shall I in bale abide, In misery my life to lead ? " To fall from my bliss, alas the while ! It was my sore and heavye lott ; And I must leave my native land, And I must live a man forgot.
Page 87 - Dutch marauders called snaphans or poultry-stealers : the light of the match betrayed them, and they could not afford to purchase the expensive wheel-lock ; they therefore substituted a flint for the pyrite, and an upright moveable furrowed piece of steel in lieu of the wheel ; the cover of the pan being pushed back, the...
Page 136 - I'm mainly ignorant What place this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments ; nor do I know Where I did sleep last night. — Pray, do not mock me ; For, as I am a man, I think that lady To be my child Cordelia.

Bibliographic information