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tersburgh, and receives an account of Gen. Phillips's death. Arrival
of three regiments from Ireland at Charles Town, enables Lord
Rawdon to march to the relief of Ninety-Six. General Greene,
having failed in his attempt to take the fort by storm, raises the lege,
ироп the approach of the British army, and is vigorously, but in-
effectually pursued. Works at Ninety-Six destroyed, and the place
abandoned. Lord Rawdon marches to the Congarees; is disap-
pointed in the expected junction of Col. Stuart, and narrowly escapes
being surrounded by the enemy, who had intercepted

the intelligence
of Stuart's failure. He forces his way through Congaree Creek,
and is joined by Col. Stuart at Orangeburgh. Gen. Greene ad-
vances to attack the British army, but retires again in the night.
Campaign closes, and fituation of the hostile forces during the fickly
season. Incredible hardships sustained, and difficulties firmounted,
by the British troops in the two Carolinas.

[72

C H A P. VỊ.

are

Great loss sustained by the Spanisha fleet in a hurricane, on its way to

the attack of West Florida. Is refitted, and again proceeds from
the Havannah. Pensacola invested by sea and land. Gallant de-
fence. Principal redoubt blown up by accident, which compels
Governor Chester, and General Campbell

, to a surrender. Welt
Indies. Ineffectual attempt on the island of St. Vincent. Dutch
island of St. Eustatius taken by the British fleet and army, under
Sir George Rodney and Gen. Vaughan. Prodigious booty. Isands
of St. Martin and Saba surrender. Dutch man of war and convoy,
on their return to Europe, pursued and taken. The settlements of
Demerary, Ilsequibo, and the Berbices, on the coast of Surinam,
make a tender of submision to the British Government, and
granted favourable conditions. Discontents, complaints, and law-
Juits, occafioned by the confiscation of private property at St. Eufta-
tius. M. de Graffe arrives with a fleet and great convoy in the
West Indies from Europe. Engagement between him and the
Admirals Sir Samuel Hood and Drake, in the Channel of St. Lucia.
Sir George Rodney departs from St. Euftatius to oppose the progress
of the enemy. Ineffective attempt made by the Marquis de Bouille
on the island of St. Lucia. French invasion of the island of Tobago.
Vigorous defence. Public Spirit of the

planters. Surrendered by
capitulation. M. de Graje, having escorted a vast convoy on its
way to Earope, proceeds with his feet to the Chesapeak, Sir
George Rodney returns to Engiand; and Sir Samuel Hood fails
with a squadron to cointeračt the designs of De Grasse at the
Chesapeak,

[98

СНАР,

CHAP. VII.

Lord Cornwallis's progress in Virginia. Paffes the River James,

and the South Anna. Parties detached to fcour the interior country. Arms and stores destroyed. Army falls back towards the fea. Rear attacked on the march to Williamsburg. Action previous to paling the River James. Lord Cornwallis fortifies the posts of York Town and Gloucester Point Transactions on the side of New York. Junction of the American army under Gen. Washington, and the French forces under the Count de Rochambeau, on the White Plains. Appearances of an attack on New York, Staten Island, and Sandy Hook. Combined army suddenly march to the Delaware, which they pass at Trenton, and continuing their course through Philadelphia, arrived at the head of Elk. Expedition, under the conduct of Gen. Arnold, to New London. Desperate defence made at Fort Griswold, which is taken by storm, with considerable loss. New London burnt. Great loss sustained by the Americans, in the destruction of naval ftores and merchandize. Sir Samuel Hood arrives off the Chesapeak; and not meeting the squadron from New York proceeds to Sandy Hook. M. de Barras fails from Rhode īpand to join the Count de Grafe. Admiral Graves departs from New York. M. de Grase arrives from the West Indies in the Chesapeak. Engagement between the British and French fleets. Lord Cornwallis's army closely blocked up on the side of the Chefapeak. The combined army are conveyed by water from Baltimore, and join the Marquis de la Fayette's forces at Williamsburg. Posts at York and Gloucester closely invested. Siege regularly formed, and trenches opened by the enemy. Resolution of a council of war at New York, to use every exertion of the fleet and army for the fucom cour of the forces in Virginia. Unavoidable delay in refitting the fleet. Sir Henry Clinton embarks, with 7000 land forces, on board the men of war. Defences of York Town ruined, and the batteries filenced, by the superior weight of the enemy's artillery. Take two redoubts, and complete their second parallel. Successful fally: The post being no longer tenable, Lord Cornwallis attempts to pass the troops over to Gloucester Point in the night, but the design is frustrated by a sudden storm. He is obliged to enter into a capitulation with Gen. Washington. Conditions. The British feet and army arrive off the Chesapeak, five days after the surrender. [118

CHAP. VIII.

State of affairs during the recess. Consequences of the riots in London.

Causes. which led to the dissolution of parliament. Resolutions of the Yorkshire committee, and of other asociated bodies. Delegates app,

pointed

P 3

tersburgh, and receives an account of Gen. Phillips's death. Arrival of three regiments from Ireland at Charles Town, enables Lord Rawdon to march to the relief of Ninety-Six. General Greene, having failed in his attempt to take the fort by storm, raises the lege, upon the approach of the British army, and is vigorously, but ineffe£tually pursued. Works at Ninety-Six destroyed, and the place abandoned. Lord Rawdon marches to the Congarees; is disappointed in the expected junction of Col. Stuart, and narrowly escapes being surrounded by the enemy, who had intercepted the intelligence of Stuart's failure. He forces his way through Congaree Creek, and is joined by Col. Stuart at Orangeburgh. Gen. Greene advances to attack the British army, but retires again in the night. Campaign closes, and situation of the hostile forces during the fickly season. Incredible hardships sustained, and difficulties furmounted, by the British troops in the two Carolinas.

[72

CH A P. VI.

Great loss sustained by the Spanish fleet in a hurricane, on its way to

the attack of West Florida. "Is refitted, and again proceeds from the Havannah. Pensacola invested by sea and land. Gallant defence. Principal redoubt blown up by accident, which compels Governor Chester, and General Campbell, to a surrender. Wefi Indies. Ineffectual attempt on the island of St. Vincent Dutch island of St. Eustatius taken by the British fleet and army, under Sir George Rodney and Gen. Vaughan. Prodigious bootg. islands of St. Martin and Saba surrender. Dutch man of war and convoy, on their return to Europe, pursued and taken. The settlements of Demerary, isequibo, and the Berbices, on the coast of Surinam, make a tender of fubmission to the British Government, and are granted favourable conditions. Discontents, complaints, and lawsuits, occafioned by the confifcation of private property at St. Euftatius. M. de Grasse arrives with a fleet and great convoy in the West Indies fron Europe. Engagement between him and the Admirals Sir Samuel Hood and Drake, in the Channel of St. Lucia. Sir George Rodney departs from St. Eustatius to oppose the progress of the enemy. Ineffective attempt made by the Marquis de Bouille on the island of St. Lucia. French invasion of the island of Tobago. Vigorous defence. Public Spirit of the planters. Surrendered by capitulation. M. de Grasse, having escorted a vast convoy on its way to Europe, proceeds with his feet to the Chesapeak, Sir George Rodney returns to England; and Sir Samuel Hood fails with a squadron to counteract the designs of De Grasse at the Chesapeak.

[98

CHAP.

CHAP. VII.

Lord Cornwallis's progress in Virginia. Passes the River James,

and the South Anna. Parties detached to fcour the interior country.
Arms and stores destroyed. Army falls back towards the fea. Rear
attacked on the march to Williamsburg. Action previous to paling
the River James. Lord Cornwallis fortifies the posts of York Town
and Gloucester Point Transactions on the side of New York.
Junction of the American army under Gen. Washington, and the
French forces under the Count de Rochambeau, on the White Plains.
Appearances of an attack on New York, Staten Isand, and Sandy
Hook. Combined army suddenly march to the Delaware, which
they pass at Trenton, and continuing their course through Philadel-
phia, arrived at the head of Elk. Expedition, under the conduct
of Gen. Arnold, to New London. Desperate defence made at Fort
Griswold, which is taken by storm, with considerable loss. New
London burnt. Great loss sustained by the Americans, in the de-
Atruction of naval fores and merchandize. Sir Samuel Hood ar-
rives off the Chesapeak; and not meeting the squadron from New
York proceeds to Sandy Hook. M. de Barras fails from Rhode
Isand to join the Count de Grase. Admiral Graves departs from
New York. M. de Grasse arrives from the West Indies in the
Chesapeak. Engagement between the British and French fleets.
Lord Cornwallis's army closely blocked up on the side of the Chefa-
peak. The combined army are conveyed by water from Baltimore,
and join the Marquis de la Fayette's forces at Williamsburg. Pots
at York and Gloucester closely invested. Siege regularly formed, and
trenches opened by the enemy. Resolution of a council of war at
New York, to use every exertion of the fleet and army for the fuc-
cour of the forces in Virginia. Unavoidable delay in refitting the
feet. Sir Henry Clinton embarks, with 7000 land forces, on board
the men of war. Defences of York Town ruined, and the bat-
teries filenced, by the superior weight of the enemy's artillery. Take
two redoubts, and complete their second parallel. Successful fally.
The post being no longer tenable, Lord Cornwallis attempts to pass
the troops over to Gloucester Point in the night, but the design is
frustrated by a sudden storm. He is obliged to enter into a capitu.
lation with Gen. Washington. Conditions. The British fleet and
army arrive off the Chesapeak, five days after the surrender. [118

CH A P. VIII.

State of affairs during the recess. Consequences of the riots in London.

Causes which led to the diffolution of parliament. Resolutions of the
Yorkshire committee, and of other asociated bodies. Delegates ap-,
P 3

pointed

pointed to attend in London. General elestion. Capture of Mr.
Laurens, and his committal to the Tower. Effekt produced by
his papers in precipitating the war with Holland. "Sir Joseph
Yorke withdraws from the Hague. Manifesto. New lords
created. Earl of Carlisle appointed to the government of Ireland.
Meeting of parliament. Debates on the choice of a speaker. Mr.
Cornewail chofen. Speech from the throne. Addresses. Amend-
ments proposed, and rijetted, in both houses. Grant of Jeamen.
Vote of thanks to the late Speaker. To the British generals and
admiral in America. Debate on the appointment of Sir Hugh
Pallifer to the government of Greenwich hospital. Recess. [137

CH A P IX.

Declaration of war against Holland, and hoftilities commenced. Mel-

sage from the throne. Debates on the Dutch war. Address moved
by the minister. Amendment moved by Lord John Cavendish.
Íhe amendment rejected upon a division; second amendment by
Lord Mahon rejected, and the original address passed. Address
moved for in the House of Lords by Lord Stormont; and an amend-
ment by the Duke of Richmond. Unusually late debate. Amend-
ment reje&ted on a division. Two Protests. Mr. Fox's motion
relative to the appointment of Sir Hugh Palliser to the govern-
ment of Greenwich Hospital. Amendment moved by the minister,
and after much debate carried upon a division. Mr. Fox's con-
cluding motion evaded, by moving for the order of the day. India
affairs. Complaints against the supreme judicature of Bengal.
Two petitions from India; one, from the governor-general and
council at Calcutta; the other, from the Britisn subjects refr.ling
in Bengal, Bahar, and Orissa. Select committee of fifteen bal-
lotted for, to examine the grounds of the petitions.

[*162

!

СНАР. Х.

Debates on 16r. Burke's bill for the regulation of the civil lift efia-

blishments. Question for the second reading over-ruled upon a
division, and the bill put off for six months. Debates on the subje&t
of the loan. Mr. Fox's

motion for omitting the lottery clause, re-
jected upon a division. Farther debates and frieures aupon the
loan. Another motion against the lattery, which is again over-
ruled upon a division. Mr. Byng's motion for a list of subscribers
to the loan, agreed to; other motions rejected. Motion for the
commitment of Sir P. J. Clerke’s contractors bill

, over-ruled upon
a division. Mr. Crewe's bill for resiraining revenue officers
from voting on eleftions of members of parliament, rejected upon
division. Debate on the Duke of Bolton's motion for an en-

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