The Novels and Miscellaneous Works of Daniel De Foe: The fortunate mistress ... Roxana. The life and adventures of Mrs. Christian Davies ... called Mother Ross. 1855

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Henry G. Bohn, 1855
 

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Page 361 - The Lord giveth, and the Lord ' taketh away ; blessed be the name of the Lord.
Page 292 - Here, after some few years of flourishing and outwardly happy circumstances, I fell into a dreadful course of calamities, and Amy also ; the very reverse of our former good days. The blast of Heaven...
Page 149 - I found it to be true, that a true-bred merchant is the best gentleman in the nation; that in knowledge, in manners, in judgment of things, the merchant outdid many of the nobility; that having once mastered the world and being above the demand of business, though no real estate, they were then superior to most gentlemen even in estate; that a merchant in flush business and a capital stock is able to spend more money than a gentleman of 5,000 a year estate; that while a merchant spent, he only...
Page 17 - Whoso stoppeth his ears at the cry of the poor, he also shall cry himself, but shall not be heard.
Page 114 - Year, and by managing my Business thus myself, and having large Sums to do with, I became as expert in it, as any SheMerchant of them all; I had Credit in the Bank for a large Sum of Money, and Bills and Notes for much more.
Page 245 - I felt something shoot thro' my Blood; my Heart flutter'd; my Head flash'd, and was dizzy, and all within me, as I thought, turn'd about, and much ado I had, not to abandon myself to an Excess of Passion at the first Sight of her, much more when my Lips touch'd her Face; I thought I must have taken her in my Arms, and kiss'd her again a thousand times, whether I wou'd or no.
Page 125 - care must be taken to manage that as you shall direct ; I hope you won't expose me for my having exposed myself to you, but I cannot go any farther." And at that point I stood, and would hear of no matrimony by any means. Now, because this may seem a little odd, I shall state the matter clearly, as I understood it myself. I knew that, while I was a mistress, it is customary for the person kept to receive from them that keep ; but if I should be a wife, all I had then was given up to the husband,...
Page 3 - ... hear, it was afterwards some advantage to me. With all these things, I wanted neither wit, beauty, or money. In this manner I set out into the world, having all the advantages that any young woman could desire, to recommend me to others, and form a prospect of happy living to myself.

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