A Tour Around the World

Front Cover
W.S. Gottsberger, 1885 - 430 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 285 - Mars' hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious. For as I passed by, and beheld your devotions, I found an altar with this inscription, TO THE UNKNOWN GOD. Whom therefore ye ignorantly worship, him declare I unto you.
Page 9 - O ye whose cheek the tear of pity stains, Draw near with pious rev'rence and attend! Here lie the loving husband's dear remains, The tender father and the gen'rous friend. The pitying heart that felt for human woe; The dauntless heart that feared no human pride; The friend of man, to vice alone a foe; "For ev'n his failings lean'd to virtue's side.
Page 137 - A double dungeon wall and wave Have made — and like a living grave. Below the surface of the lake The dark vault lies...
Page 48 - It is my wish that my ashes may repose on the banks of the Seine, in the midst of the French people, whom I have loved so well.
Page 346 - Sacred to the perpetual memory of a great company of Christian people, chiefly women and children, who near this spot were cruelly murdered by the followers of the rebel Nana Dhundu Panth of Bithur, and cast, the dying with the dead, into the well below, on the xvth day of July, MDCCCLVII.
Page 197 - I STOOD in Venice, on the Bridge of Sighs ; A palace and a prison on each hand : I saw from out the wave her structures rise As from the stroke of the enchanter's wand : A thousand years their cloudy wings expand Around me, and a dying Glory smiles O'er the far times, when many a subject land...
Page 9 - O YE whose cheek the tear of pity stains, Draw near with pious rev'rence, and attend! Here lie the loving husband's dear remains, The tender father, and the gen'rous friend. The pitying heart that felt for human woe, The dauntless heart that fear'd no human pride, The friend of man — to vice alone a foe ; For ' ev'n his failings lean'd to virtue's side.
Page 247 - It is harder for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven than for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle!
Page 313 - What is this world?' says a Brahman sage. 'It is even as the bough of a tree, on which a bird rests for a night, and in the morning flies away.
Page 337 - Frenchman by birth, . . . who, after defrauding several of the Princes of Europe, by means of false gems, which he fabricated with peculiar skill, sought refuge in the Great Mogol's court, where he made his fortune.

Bibliographic information