The Contribution of Boston to American Independence: Oration Delivered Before the Mayor and Citizens of Boston at the One Hundred and Twenty-first Celebration of the Declaration of Independence, Monday, July 5, 1897

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order of the City Council, 1897 - 40 pages
 

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Page 21 - But — ah ! — Him ! the first great martyr in this great cause! Him! the premature victim of his own selfdevoting heart! Him! the head of our civil councils and the destined leader of our military bands, whom nothing brought hither but the unquenchable fire of his own spirit; him...
Page 22 - Him! cut off by Providence in the hour of overwhelming anxiety and thick gloom; falling ere he saw the star of his country rise; pouring out his generous blood like water, before he knew whether it would fertilize a land of freedom or of bondage!— how shall I struggle with the emotions that stifle the utterance of thy name! Our poor work may perish; but thine shall endure! This monument may moulder away; the solid ground it rests upon may sink down to a level with the sea; but thy memory shall...
Page 22 - But ah ! Him ! the first great martyr in this great cause ! Him ! the premature victim of his own self-devoting heart ! Him ! the head of our civil councils, and the destined leader of our military bands, whom nothing brought hither but the unquenchable fire of his own spirit ! Him ! cut off...
Page 17 - You will notice the resolution relative to an attack upon Boston. This passed after a most serious debate in a committee of the whole house, and the execution was referred to you. May God crown your attempt with success. I most heartily wish it, though individually I may be the greatest sufferer.
Page 26 - Said our Lady of the Snows. A Nation spoke to a Nation, A Throne sent word to a Throne: 'Daughter am I in my mother's house, But mistress in my own!
Page 22 - I the head of our civil councils, and the destined leader of our military bands, whom nothing brought hither but the unquenchable fire of his own spirit ! Him ! cut off by Providence in the hour of overwhelming anxiety and thick gloom ; falling, ere he saw the star of his country rise ; pouring out his generous blood, like water, before he knew whether it would fertilize a land of freedom or of bondage!
Page 27 - If we had not given way in the article of the fishery, we should have had no treaty at all. Mr. Adams having declared that he would never put his hand to any treaty, if the restraints regarding the 3 leagues and 15 leagues were not dispensed with, as well as that denying his countrymen the privilege of drying fish on the unsettled parts of Nova Scotia.
Page 10 - FANEUIL HALL is the cradle of liberty, and the child was born not far away. It was in the council chamber of the old Statehouse yonder that "American independence was born.* These are the words of John Adams, whose features you are looking on. He assisted at the birth, and he has told for us the story. He says, speaking of that day: "Otis was a flame of fire; Otis hurried everything before him. American independence was then and there born. In fifteen years the child grew up to manhood, and declared...
Page 25 - These united colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States." It is not the declaration of a future which one hopes for, as the people of Crete to-day might declare that they will be independent to-morrow and in the future. It is the declaration of what has been for generations, of what is on this Fourth of July, 1776, of what shall be till time shall end. The State of Massachusetts was independent under its old charter. It corned its own money, it made its own wars, it signed...

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