Miscellanea Curiosa: Being a Collection of Some of the Principal Phaenomena in Nature, Accounted for by the Greatest Philosophers of this Age. Together with Several Discourses Read Before the Royal Society, for the Advancement of Physical and Mathematical Knowledge, Volume 1

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Page 109 - These things being so, it can be no longer disputed, whether there be colours in the dark, nor whether they be the qualities of the objects we see, no nor perhaps, whether Light be a Body.
Page 104 - Prismes, and reflected it with Bodies, which in Day-light were of other colours; I have intercepted it with the coloured film of Air interceding two compressed plates of glass, transmitted it through coloured Mediums, and through Mediums irradiated with other sorts of Rays, and diversely terminated it; and yet could never produce any new colour out of it.
Page 104 - ... and reflected it with bodies, which in day-light were of other colours; I have intercepted it with the coloured film of air interceding two compressed plates of glass; transmitted it through coloured mediums, and through mediums irradiated with other sorts of rays, and diversely terminated it; and yet could never produce any new colour out of it.
Page 299 - And to account it as a Blessing that we have survived, perhaps by many Years, that Period of Life, whereat the one half of the whole Race of Mankind does not arrive.
Page 287 - Persons of the Age proposed, and divide it by the difference between it and the number of those of the Aye of the Party proposed; and that shews the odds there is between the Chances of the Party's living or dying.
Page 12 - Thus, then, is one part of the vapours, blown upon the land, returned by the rivers into the sea, from whence they came. Another part, by the cool of the night, falls in dews, or else in rains, again into the sea, before it reaches the land, which is by much the...
Page 89 - ... heavier than the medium wherein they floated ; fo that they defcend towards the earth, and, in their fall, meeting with other aqueous particles, they incorporate together, and form little drops...
Page 99 - Then I began to suspect whether the rays, after their trajection through the prism, did not move in curve lines, and according to their more or less curvity tend to divers parts of the wall. And it increased my suspicion, when I remembered that I had often seen a tennis ball, struck with an oblique racket, describe such a curve line.
Page 106 - I have often with admiration beheld that all the colours of the prism being made to converge, and thereby to be again mixed, as they were in the light before it was incident upon the...
Page 98 - And having placed it at my window, as before, I observed, that by turning it a little about its axis to and fro, so as to vary its obliquity to the light, more than...

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