The good-natured man, a comedy ed. by H. Littledale

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John Cumberland, 1884 - 68 pages
 

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Page 82 - We were told that universal benevolence was what first cemented society; we were taught to consider all the wants of mankind as our own; to regard the human face divine with affection and esteem ; he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered us incapable of withstanding the slightest impulse made either by real * Friedman numbers this XXVII.
Page 6 - A man of letters at present, whose works are valuable, is perfectly sensible of their value. Every polite member of the community by buying what he writes, contributes to reward him. The ridicule therefore of living in a garret, might have been wit in the last age, but continues such no longer, because no longer true.
Page 14 - PRESS'D by the load of life, the weary mind Surveys the general toil of human kind ; With cool submission joins the lab'ring train, And social sorrow loses half its pain : Our anxious bard, without complaint, may share This bustling season's epidemic care, Like...
Page 14 - Distrest alike, the statesman and the wit, When one a borough courts, and one the pit. The busy candidates for power and fame, Have hopes, and fears, and wishes, just the same ; Disabled both to combat, or to fly, Must hear all taunts, and hear without reply. Uncheck'd, on both loud rabbles vent their rage, As mongrels bay the lion in a cage. Th...
Page 7 - Chambers, you find, is gone far, and poor Goldsmith is gone much further. He died of a fever, exasperated, as I believe, by the fear of distress. He had raised money and squandered it, by every artifice of acquisition and folly of expence. But let not his frailties be remembered ; he was a very great man.
Page 26 - I consider every look, every expression of your esteem, as due only to me. This is folly, perhaps: I allow it: but it is natural to suppose, that merit which has made an impression on one's own heart, may be powerful over that of another. (127) Leon. Don't, my life's treasure, don't let us make imaginary evils, when you know we have so many real ones to encounter.
Page 7 - ... sensible of their value. Every polite member of the community, by buying what he writes, contributes to reward him. The ridicule, therefore, of living in a garret might have been wit in the last age, but continues such no longer, because no longer true. A writer of real merit now may easily be rich, if his heart be set only on fortune : and for those who have no merit, it is but fit that such should remain in merited obscurity."— GOLDSMITH : Citizen of the World, Let.

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