In the Side Shows

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Hodder and Stoughton, 1919 - 310 pages
"The following pages hardly touch on the famous incidents of the War. There is no record of its chief events, no echo of its great controversies. This book is the simple diary of a citizen soldier, a story of four years of happy adventure whose measure of variety was pressed down and running over. But I have attempted more than a story. The War was an education for millions and I have tried to explain how it influenced me." --W.B., from the Introduction.
 

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Page 25 - English blood running in their veins. Such superb martial spectacles are rare in modern war. Ordinarily it should always be possible to bring up reserves under some sort of cover from shrapnel fire. Here, for a mile and a half, there was nothing to conceal a mouse, much less some of the most stalwart soldiers England has ever sent from her shores. Despite the critical events in other parts of the field, I could hardly take my glasses from the yeomen. They moved like men marching on parade. Here and...
Page 218 - ... mud of the Montello. A Nieuport comes down like a torch hurled from heaven — the famous airman, Major Barracca, is a heap of ashes. His list of victories is the same as that of his most victorious Austrian adversary, Captain Brumowsky, who conquered thirty-four opponents. Lieutenant von Hoffmann, in peace time a Ministerial official in Vienna, and his band dash against the biplanes. Like raging bulldogs the English now advance on their furiously swift Sopwiths against our airmen, engineers,...
Page 80 - The natives appear, however, to have secreted some of these precious relics ; for the celebrated Sir John Maundeville, who travelled in л. в. 1322, relates that there might still be seen in his time at Joppa, "the place in the rock where the iron chains were fastened, wherewith Andromeda, a great giant, was bound and put in prison before Noah's flood ; a rib of whose side, which is forty feet long, is still shown.
Page 218 - Now their motors hum again and tneir machine-guns rattle. A hail of steel pelts down on the pontoons, which sink riddled. The guns of the defence bark from the bank and fragments of their shrapnel endanger the lives of their own men, men whom they wish to protect. One, two, three of the great Caproni bombarding planes descend, shot down on the mud of the Montello. A Xieuport comes down like a torch hurled from Heaven — the fanious airman, Major Barracca is a heap of ashes.
Page 128 - My heart! Is she poor? — What costs it to be styled a donor? Merely an earth to cleave, a sea to part. But that fortune should have thrust all this upon her! (Nay, list!
Page 25 - During this march they came under a remarkably steady and accurate artillery fire. The advance of these English Yeomen was a sight calculated to send a thrill of pride through anyone with a drop of English blood running in their veins. Such superb martial spectacles are rare in modern war. Ordinarily it should always be possible to bring up reserves under some sort of cover from shrapnel fire. Here, for a mile and a half, there was nothing to conceal a mouse, much less some of the most stalwart soldiers...
Page 262 - MINE be a cot beside the hill; A bee-hive's hum shall soothe my ear; A willowy brook that turns a mill, With many a fall shall linger near. The swallow oft beneath my thatch Shall twitter from her clay-built nest ; Oft shall the pilgrim lift the latch, And share my meal, a welcome guest.
Page 218 - ... biplanes. Like raging bulldogs the English now advance on their furiously swift Sopwiths against our airmen, engineers, artillery, and infantry. Nothing, absolutely nothing, avails. The enemy airmen are too numerous, the enemy's shells too many. Like Sisyphus multiplied a hundred-fold the bridge builders work incessantly; they fall and disappear in the flood without a cry; they launch new pontoons; they think out new methods of transport from bank to bank — nothing helps; absolutely nothing...
Page 218 - The guns of the defense bark from the bank and the fragments of their shrapnel endanger the lives of their own men, men whom they wish to protect. One, two, three of the great Caproni bombarding planes descend, shot down on the mud of the Montello. A Nieuport comes down like a torch hurled from heaven — the famous airman, Major Barracca, is a heap of ashes. His list of victories is the same as that of his most victorious Austrian adversary, Captain Brumowsky, who conquered thirty-four opponents....
Page 80 - And you shall understand that it is one of the oldest towns of the world, for it was founded before Noah's flood. And there may still be seen in the rock there the place where the iron chains were fastened, wherewith Andromeda, a great giant, was bound and put in prison, before Noah's flood ; a rib of whose side, which is forty feet long, is still shown f.

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