Milton and Religious Controversy: Satire and Polemic in Paradise Lost

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 2000 M06 22 - 227 pages
Religious satire and polemic constitute an elusive presence in Paradise Lost. John N. King demonstrates how we must read the text in a way that is true to its contemporary commitments and cultural dialogues. Vituperative sermons, broadsides and pamphlets, notably Milton's own tracts, uncover the poem's engagement with the violent history of the Civil Wars, Commonwealth and Restoration, while contemporary visual satires help us to understand Miltonic practice. This important study sheds new light on Milton's epic and its literary and religious contexts.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Controversial merriment
xvii
Milton reads Spensers May Eclogue
19
Satan and the demonic conclave
40
Miltons Den of Error
65
The Paradise of Fools
85
Laughter in heaven
105
Miltonic transubstantiation
129
Idolatry in Eden
149
The image of both churches
163
Conclusion
185
transcriptions from satirical broadsheets
192
Select Bibliography
202
Index
218
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Bibliographic information