Adventures of the Connaught Rangers: From 1808 to 1814, Volume 2

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H. Colburn, 1847
 

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Page 201 - Although circumstances may alter the relations in which he has stood towards them for some years so much to his satisfaction, he assures them he will never cease to feel the warmest interest in their welfare and honour, and that he will be at all times happy to be of any service to those, to whose conduct, discipline and gallantry, their country is so much indebted.
Page 158 - Burgos on the one hand, and from Madrid on the other, the Officers lost all command over their men. Irregularities and outrages of all descriptions were committed with impunity ; and losses have been sustained which ought never to have occurred. Yet the necessity for retreat existing, none was ever made...
Page 293 - War is the condition of this world. From man to the smallest insect all are at strife, and the glory of arms, which cannot be obtained without the exercise of honour, fortitude, courage, obedience, modesty, and temperance, excites the brave man's patriotism and is a chastening corrective for the rich man's pride.
Page 159 - I have frequently observed and lamented in the late campaign, the facility and celerity with which the French soldiers cooked in comparison with those of our army. ' The cause of this disadvantage is the same with that of every other description, the want of attention of the officers to the orders of the army, and the conduct of their men, and the consequent want of authority over their conduct.
Page 4 - ... infuriated and licentious soldiers for two days and two nights, — if, I say, he can fancy this, he can well imagine the horrors that were acted within the walls of Badajoz. In the first burst, all the wine and spirit stores were forced open and ransacked from top to bottom ; and it required but a short time for the men to get into that fearful state that was alike dangerous to all — officers or soldiers, or the inhabitants of the city. Casks of the choicest wines and brandy were dragged into...
Page 297 - From what I have seen of the objects of the French Government and the sacrifices they make to accomplish them, I have no doubt that if the British army were for any reason to withdraw from the Peninsula...
Page 158 - I have ever read ; yet this army has met with no disaster; it has suffered no privations, which but trifling attention on the part of the officers could not have prevented ; and for which there existed no reason whatever in the nature of the service...
Page 298 - Majesty's dominions. Then indeed would commence an expensive contest ; then would His Majesty's subjects discover what are the miseries of war, of which, by the blessing of God, they have hitherto had no knowledge ; and the cultivation, the beauty, and prosperity of the country, and the virtue and happiness of its inhabitants would be destroyed, whatever might be the result of the military operations. God forbid that I should be a witness, much less an actor in the scene...
Page 14 - Whitelaw, of the 88th, led the advance of the ladders ; he lost his life in so doing, but his name nowhere appears, except in the list of killed ! Lieutenant William Mackie, the neglected and discountenanced leader of the forlorn-hope at Rodrigo — was most conspicuous during the assault of the castle of Badajoz, and was one of the first — if not the very first, to enter it; yet no mention is made of him. Captain Seton, commanding the regiment, and commanding such a fine fighting regiment as the...
Page 297 - Wellington will suffice. They captured more than one strong place in Spain without any provision of bullets save those fired at them by their enemies, having trusted to that chance when they formed the siege ! Before the British troops they fell ; but how terrible was the struggle, how many defeats they recovered from, how many brave men they slew ; what changes and interpositions of fortune occurred before they could be rolled...

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