The Imperial Island: England's Chronicle in Stone

Front Cover
Ticknor, 1886 - 445 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 230 - The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself; * Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like the baseless fabric of a vision, Leave not a wreck behind.
Page 233 - THOSE WHO BEST DESERVE THEIR GRATITUDE THE KING HIS MINISTERS, AND MANY OF THE NOBLES AND COMMONERS OF THE REALM RAISED THIS MONUMENT TO JAMES WATT WHO DIRECTING THE FORCE OF AN ORIGINAL GENIUS EARLY EXERCISED IN PHILOSOPHIC RESEARCH TO THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE...
Page 230 - No more the Grecian muse unrivall'd reigns, To Britain let the nations homage pay : She felt a Homer's fire in Milton's strains, A Pindar's rapture in the lyre of Gray.
Page 122 - Pisano, the Italian restorer of Sculpture, exercised the art in his own country : it was also finished forty-six years before the Cathedral of Amiens, and thirty-six years before the Cathedral of Orvieto was begun ; and it seems to be the first specimen of such magnificent and varied sculpture, united in a series of sacred history, that is to be found in Western Europe.
Page 229 - Here lies (expecting the second coming of our Saviour Christ Jesus) the body of Edmund Spenser, the Prince of Poets in his time, whose divine spirit needs no other witness than the works which he left behind him.
Page 372 - The Castle of BLENHEIM was founded by Queen ANNE, In the Fourth Year of her Reign, In the Year of the Christian /Era 1705. A Monument designed to perpetuate the Memory of the Signal Victory Obtained over the French and Bavarians, Near the Village of Blenheim, , On the Banks of the Danube...
Page 230 - Tutor'd by thee, hence poetry exalts Her voice to ages; and informs the page With music, image, sentiment, and thought, Never to die...
Page 237 - I judge this to be true, and utter it with heaviness, that neither the Britons under the Romans and Saxons, nor yet the English people under the Danes and Normans had ever such damage of their learned Monuments as we have seen in our time. Our posterity may well curse this wicked fact of our age, this unreasonable spoil of England's most noble Antiquities.
Page 241 - That suffereth with the dead their memory to sleep ? When not great Arthur's tomb, nor holy Joseph's grave, From sacrilege had power their sacred bones to save ; He who that God in man to his sepulchre brought, Or he which for the faith twelve famous battles fought.
Page 157 - The construction is English, the profiles of the mouldings are English, the ornaments are English, the execution of the work belongs to the English school of workmen of the beginning of the thirteenth century.

Bibliographic information