A History of the Holy Catholic Inquisition

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Nathan Moore, 1843 - 188 pages
 

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Page 113 - Fe were, in general, just; but he said the writer judged untruly of the motives of the Inquisitors, and very uncharitably of the character of the Holy Church ; and I admitted that, under the pressure of his peculiar suffering, this might possibly be the case. The Inquisitor was now anxious to know to what extent Dellon's book had been circulated in Europe.
Page 120 - ... told me she was waiting there to be called up before the tribunal of the Inquisition. While I was asking questions concerning her crime, the second Inquisitor came out in evident trepidation, and was about to complain of the intrusion ; when I informed him I had come back for the letter from the chief Inquisitor. He said it should be sent after me to Goa ; and he conducted me with a quick step towards the door. As we passed the poor woman I pointed to her, and said to him with some emphasis,...
Page 113 - Ceremonies;' together with plates of the system of torture and burnings at the Auto da Fe. I added that it was now generally believed in Europe, that these enormities no longer existed, and that the Inquisition itself had been totally suppressed; but that I was concerned to find that this was not the case. He now began a grave narration to...
Page 112 - On the second morning after my arrival, I was surprised by my host, the Inquisitor, coming into my apartment clothed in black robes from head to foot; for the usual dress of his order is white. He said he was going to sit on the tribunal of the Holy Office. ' I presume, Father, your august office does not occupy much of your time.' ' Yes,' answered hej 'much. I sit on the tribunal three or four days every week.
Page 110 - The day was now far spent, and my companions were about to leave me. While I was considering whether I should return with them, Major Pareira said he would first introduce me to a Priest, high in office, and one of the most learned men in the place. We accordingly walked to the Convent of the Augustinians. where I was presented to Joseph a Doloribus, a man well advanced in life, of pale visage and penetrating eye, rather of a reverend appearance, and possessing great fluency of speech and urbanity...
Page 115 - ... said to me, as we were ascending the steps of the outer stair, that he hoped I should be satisfied with a transient view of the Inquisition, and that I would retire whenever he should desire it. I took this as a good omen, and followed my conductor with tolerable confidence. " He led me first to the great hall of the Inquisition. We were met at the door by a number of well-dressed persons, who, I afterwards understood, were the familiars and attendants of the Holy Office.
Page 29 - Blessed be the day of Martin Luther's birth ! It should be a festival only second to that of the Nativity.
Page 118 - side, where the victims were brought to the stake at "..the Auto da Fe. It is close to the Palace, that the " Vice-Roy and his Court may witness the execution ; " for it has ever been the policy of the Inquisition to " make these spiritual executions appear to be the exe
Page 112 - I had thought, for some days, of putting Dellon's book into the Inquisitor's hands; for if I could get him to advert to the facts stated in that book, I should be able to learn, by comparison, the exact state of the Inquisition at the present time. In the evening he came in, as usual, to pass an hour in my apartment. After some conversation I took the pen in my hand to write a few notes in my journal; and, as if to amuse him, while I was writing, I took up Dellon's...
Page 114 - ... burnings at the auto da fe. I added that it was now generally believed in Europe, that these enormities no longer existed, and that the Inquisition itself had been totally suppressed ; but that I was concerned to find that this was not the case. He now began a grave narration, to show that the Inquisition had undergone a change in some respects, and that its terrors were mitigated.

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