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246
33
35
275
341
346

348
348--390

345
197
200
299
300
302
379
399

Bible—not a subject for merriment
Biography—its use

how to be written

its tendency
Block-heads--their use

how to be treated

a triumvirate thereof
Blunderbuss-Mr. Bernard
Breeds--their distinctive qualities
Britain her state in 1780

her trade now
her financial state now
her exports and imports
her property real and

personal
British nobility--their taste
Burke-Edmund, his motion in 1775

с
Cabinet-double and secret in America
Cairo—in Egypt, its nastiness
Catalogue-of ladies
Character-good—its high value
Chatham-Lord-rejection of his bill for America
Chesterfield-Lord-his writings
Children-how to be taught
Cicero-his son—what
Cleanliness—a gage of civilization
Combination of block-heads-why
Comprehension—necessary to admiration
Constitution of America jeopardized
Country-lovely near Perth, in Scotland

D
D'Alembert's plan of learning a language
Debt-British national
Decision-of character-what
Dedications—why not frequent, now
Doggrel--not hudibrastic

Mr. Diggory--what
inferior to dowlass cloth
its component parts

advice to Mr. Diggory
Duelling-reprobated
Dufief–his genius, and knowledge
Dunciad-its materials

E
Education—not possible without restraint
Emulation promoted by popular government

409
239
263
181
397
376

91
345
241
350
132
408
284

91
300
183.
206
254
260
387
388
393
180
368
347

24

69

Engravings of the Echo

244
of Collins and Perkins' Bible

309
Essays--their use

21
Europe-how situated

164

F
Fame the light of Fancy

313
Fancy-its charins

311
to be tempered by Judgment

312
its power of incitement

313
refines sensible pleasure

314-317
Feelings, tender, how cherished

185
by early associations

186
by improving the mind

276
Fine arts,—the soil of Fancy

317
Flim-flam-Mr. Francis

348–390
Folly—a fit subject for ridicule

245
no slander in a fool

292
use of fools

349
Force—the arbiter of contending nations

299
Foreigners—ignorant of the American character 232
Franklin Dr.-abused by Lord Sandwich

397
French-how a great people

95
revolution,-its design

96
state of France under Louis 14th

130
fraudulent politics -

154
profligacy of morals and character

170
ignorant of Greek learning

228
not wiser by misfortunes

240
literature, now, very low

249
relative situation of Britain and France

298
Friendship--of Gifford for Belgrave

209
between nations rare

270

G
Gander, Mr. George-his poem

287
his character

391 .
Gage-General-his perfidy

405
Genius, cramped by private patronage

131
its errors malignantly watched

316
how. constituted

316
Gifford--the poet and critic,-his character

207
Government-its duty

210
self-government

344
Grammar-what?

152
necessary for the correct attainment of language 155
nonsense concerning

242
its tendency and use

226
in danger of perishing

290

O

Grammar-its necessity

294
despised by the American Reviewers

366
Gun-boats-recommended by the President

417

H
Harm-how to do most among nations

417
Hayti—its political aspect

369
Heaven-Christian and Turkish

236
History—gives only a summary view of man

34
retrospective of America

45
how to be written

45
of the passing times

55
President's message

55
Spanish aggressions—British aggressions

56 58
British ministry,—their conduct

63
non-importation bill

119
retrospective of America

189
of the passing times

196
Randolph, on the non-importation bill

197
what history most interesting

262
of the passing times

265
use of history

275
of the passing times

332
retrospective of America

394
of the passing times-non-importation bill 407
Hogarth—his painting of Felix trembling

244
Hudibrastic—not doggrel

254

I
Idea-what-has no necessary connection with words 152
Idiots-cherished in Switzerland

342
Ignorance-general

352
Imagination-joys of less than those of sense

279
of a poet, what

310
its inventive power-synonimous with
Fancy

312
disdains the restraint of art

355
Impressment-of seamen,

232 269
Indians-improving

419
Indecision-of character-its evils

183
Instruction—its progressive power

215
Intellect-its triumphs-like the rising sun -

252-3
Interest-of money, a gage of national prosperity, 302
Introduction—shewing the plan of the work

1-3
Irish-oppressed by England

249
their joy at American opposition to Britain 394
Irony—its power

198

J
Jacobinism-detested by all honest men

338

O

Jacobinism-its horrible tendency

245
destroys literature

249
levels all talent

343
its cowardly insufficiency

370
its state policy

372
Jones—Sir Wm.-his opinion as to duty

102
Judgment—combined with Fancy

312
Judith-killing Holofernes

293
Juvenal's character

274

K
Killakranky-pass of

356
Knowledge-not given by nature

251
Land-price of, a gage of national prosperity

302
Language-has no connection with ideas

152
what-how learned by children

156 7
how best learned

255 293
use of the dead languages

227
Law-study of, its tendency

189
sage maxim thereof, about stultifying

348
Lexington— first blood drawn between America and
Britain

400
Liberty—and Knowledge perish together

249
Licentiousness-in writing-what-

273 280
Life-best seen in common pursuits

33
Literature-exists only in free states

66
its present independence, and benefits 206 227
destroyed by tyranny

349
always proportioned to its effectual demand 264
destroyed by profligacy

375
Locke's book on education—what

291
Lords, British, their protest against oppressing America 197
Louisiana—its tenure by America

165
its political aspect

369
Love-how heightened

74
noblest of passions

324
destroyed by lust

374
is not merely sensual

375
is constant and permanent in attachment 378
Lucretius his opinion of marriage

168
M
Mana bundle of contradictions

74
how all men equal

36
formed to command and to obey
Manufactures—not good for young

countries
Marmontel-his character

88
Marriage-the bulwark of society

167
Memory-a very good thing

363
Metaphysics-how employed

86

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95

28

342
418
372
172
393
172

26
250

419
227
251
269
233
230
266
177
233
378
398
349
276

Middle-men-what
Militia-how to be classed
Mirabaud's advice to politicians
Moira—Earl of—his character
Montagu-Lady Mary Wortley
Moore-Anacreon, his character
Moral obligation-rests solely upon revelation

alone dignifies life

N
Navy-American—in peace
Nature-her method of teaching

gives no knowledge
Negroes independent-what
Neutrality-declaration of, by America

neutral rights --what

neutral trade
News-papers-American, very scurrilous
Non-importation bill—its folly
Nonsense-specimen of
North-Lord-his conduct towards America
Nothing—what,—as a whole, or in parts
Novels--their tendency

O
Oeconomy-of our present administration

of peddling politicians
Opinion-public-its influence-its certainty
Oracles ancient—what

P
Parties—their use in a nation
whigs and tories

double cabinet, in Britain
effects thereof upon America

double cabinet in America
Patronage-public better than private

of Charles 2d
of Louis 14th
necessity of national patronage
of Cosmo de Medici-of Lord Grosvenor
the people are the patrons in Britain

no governmental patronage in America
Perfectibility of man
Personality-pot proper-why

of the Salmagundi,—why
Philosophy-how employed sometimes

modern, its tendency
Physicians-a consultation of
Plague-in Egypt, how caused
Poetry-power of a lofty imagination

fame difficult of attainment
consolation of religion
pursuits of genius

232
371
183
372

50

51
63 4
370 409

70
71
129
133
207
209
211
316
348

391
158 9
214

81
239

6
6
10

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