Proceedings of the Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow

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Page 65 - ... the very point of the first thread in this apparently tangled skein, is no other than such a principle of attraction ; and all principles beside are void of a real basis ; from such a propensity arises every motion perceived in heavenly or terrestrial bodies.
Page 263 - Now came still Evening on, and Twilight gray Had in her sober livery all things clad; Silence accompanied; for beast and bird, They to their grassy couch, these to their nests Were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale. She all night long her amorous descant sung; Silence was pleased.
Page 157 - They exclude the soil pipe atmosphere to such an extent that what escapes through the water is so little in amount, and so purified by filtration, as to be perfectly harmless ; and they exclude entirely all germs and particles.
Page 3 - And the leper in whom the plague is, his clothes shall be rent, and his head bare, and he shall put a covering upon his upper lip, and shall cry, Unclean, unclean. 46 All the days wherein the plague shall be in him he shall be defiled; he is unclean: he shall dwell alone; without the camp shall his habitation be.
Page 77 - STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring; for ornament, is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business; for expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one: but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs come best from those that are learned.
Page 45 - ... their enemies with tempests and thunderbolts shot from their walls. It is said that the Egyptian Hercules and Bacchus, when they overran India...
Page 65 - ... point of the first thread, in this apparently tangled skein, is no other than such a principle of attraction, and all principles beside are void of a real basis ; from such a propensity arises every motion perceived in heavenly, or in terrestrial bodies ; it is a disposition to be attracted, which taught hard steel to rush from its place and rivet itself on the magnet; it is the same disposition, which impels the light straw to attach itself firmly on amber...
Page 65 - There is a strong propensity which dances through every atom, and attracts the minutest particle to some peculiar object ; search this universe from its base to its summit, from fire to air, from water to earth, from all below the moon to all above the celestial spheres, and thou wilt not find a corpuscle destitute of that natural attractibility...
Page 45 - Hyphasis, he might doubtless have made himself master of the country all around them ; but their cities he never could have taken, though he had led a thousand as brave as Achilles or three thousand such as Ajax, to the assault, for they come not out...
Page 65 - ... spirit which he suspected to pervade natural bodies and lying concealed in them, to cause attraction and repulsion, the emission, reflection, and refraction of light, electricity, calefaction, sensation, and muscular motion, is described by the Hindus as a fifth element endowed with those very powers ; and the Vedas abound with allusions to a force universally attractive, which they chiefly ascribe to the sun, thence called Aditya, or the attractor...

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