The Works of the Rev. George Crabbe, Volume 5

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J. Murray, 1823
 

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Page 85 - With all its dark intensity of shade ; Where the rough wind alone was heard to move, In this, the pause of nature and of love, When now the young are...
Page 352 - Jacques was there t' explain and to persuade. Here, on this lawn, thy boys and girls shall run, And play their gambols when their tasks are done ; There, from that window, shall their mother view The happy tribe, and smile at all they do ; While thou, more gravely, hiding thy delight, Shalt cry "O! childish!
Page 84 - Early he rose, and look'd with many a sigh On the red light that fill'd the eastern sky; Oft had he stood before, alert and gay, To hail the glories of the new-born day : But now dejected, languid, listless, low, He saw the wind upon the water blow, And the cold stream...
Page 86 - Five years had past, and what was Henry then? The most repining of repenting men ; With a fond, teasing, anxious wife, afraid Of all attention to another paid ; Yet powerless she her husband to amuse, Lives but t...
Page 85 - When now the young are rear'd, and when the old, Lost to the tie, grow negligent and cold — Far to the left he saw the huts of men, Half hid in mist, that hung upon the fen ; Before him swallows, gathering for the sea, Took their short flights, and twitter'd on the lea ; And near the bean-sheaf stood, the harvest done, And slowly blacken'd in the sickly sun...
Page 6 - O ! how the passions, insolent and strong, " Bear our weak minds their rapid course along ; " Make us the madness of their will obey ; " Then die, and leave us to our griefs a prey...
Page 323 - And there was something fearful in the sight, And in the sound of what appear'd to-night ; For now, of night and nervous terror bred, Arose a strong and superstitious dread; She heard strange noises, and the shapes she saw Of fancied beings bound her soul in awe. The moon was risen, and she sometimes shone Through thick white clouds, that flew tumultuous on, Passing beneath her with an eagle's speed, That her soft light imprison'd and then freed ; The fitful glimmering through the hedge-row green...
Page 51 - It is a lovely place, and at the side Rises a mountain-rock in rugged pride ; And in that rock are shapes of shells, and forms Of creatures in old worlds, of nameless worms, Whose generations lived and died ere man, A worm of other class, to crawl began.
Page 39 - The gay, the grateful wife, whom I was glad To see in dress beyond our station. clad, And to behold among our neighbours fine, More than perhaps became a wife of mine ; And now among her neighbours to explore, And see her poorest of the...
Page 77 - Fanny, dear girl ! has in my spouse and me Friends of a kind we wish our friends to be, None of the poorest — nay, sir, no reply, You shall not need — and we are born to die ; And one yet crawls on earth, of whom, I say, That what he has he cannot take away : Her mother's father, one who has a store Of this world's goods and always looks for more ; But, next his money, loves the girl at heart, And she will have it when they come to part.

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