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of life; but made like unto the Son of God, abideth a priest continually, Heb. 7. 3. thefe Texts do manifeftly Ca relate to Chrift's Human Nature, the former of them being part of the Account of his Sufferings in the Flesh, and the latter affirming the fame of Melchizedech, which is affirmed of Chrift. And confequently neither of them can be ftrained to fignify the Eternal Generation of the WORD, or Divine Nature of Chrift.

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Thirdly, Becaufe our Lord, even after his Afcenfion and Glorification, is called fometimes God and fometimes Man, and at other Times denoted by fuch Titles, as belong to him refpectively upon the account of either his Divine or his Human Nature; tis plain, that in his prefent exalted State neither of his Natures is deftroy'd, nor are they confounded; but he continues perfect God and perfect Man. Wherefore,

Fourthly, Since the two Natures are ftill diftinct and diverfe, in themselves, tho' fo closely united to each other; therefore thofe things may ftill be spoken of him as Man, which can't be fpoken of him as God; and thofe things may ftill be fpoken of him as God, which can't be fpoken of him as Man. And accordingly,

Fifthly, When any thing is fpoken of him under the Name of Man, or under any of thofe Titles which belong to him as Man, we ought not to underftand thofe things of, or apply them to, his Divine Nature: and when any thing is fpoken of him. under the Name of God, or under fome Title which belongs to him as God, we ought not to understand those things of, or apply them to, his Human Nature. I fay, we ought not to ftretch what is thus respectively spoken, to that Nature which it is not

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primarily applicable to, or grounded on; unless there be manifeft Reafon from the Context, or from the Nature of the things fpoken, fo to de. For,

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Sixthly, By reafon of the Union of the two Natures, fome things are affirmed of the God, which are true of the Human Nature only; and other things are affirmed of the Man, which are true of the Divine Nature only. For Inftance, 'tis affirmed of the God, that he was received up into glory, 1 Tim. 3. 16. which evidently regards the Exaltation of the Man Chrift Jefus, as I have (c) already fhewn and 'tis affirmed of him, through whofe blood we have redemption, Col. 1. 14, 20. and who is the first born from the dead, v. 18. (which Particulars do manifeftly point at, and belong to, Chrift's Human Nature) that by him were all things created, Col. 1. 16. which was certainly don by the WORD or Divine Nature. In thefe Cafes, the plain Meaning is, that fuch things are affirmed of that compounded Perfon, who because he has two Natures; is therefore fignify'd by the Names or Titles of either of them, as the Divine Penmen thought moft proper; there being no Name given to Chrift by infpired Writers, which denotes both Natures united in one Perfon, fuch as dáver, God-Man,'λojavo¿wπ©, Word-Man, or the like. For tho' the Name Emmanuel, which feems pretty nearly to denote the two Natures united, is apply'd to our Lord, Matt. 1. 23. yet 'tis notorious, that he is not elfewhere called by that Name, or by any other of the fame Import. But then,

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(c) Chap. 6. P. 35.

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Seventhly, It is to be noted, that when the infpired Writers fpeak of our holy Redeemer, they give him fuch a Name (whether implying his being God or Man) as the first thing they mention of him, does require, or the principal thing they have in view, directs them to. And whatever things are afterwards mentioned of him under the Name or Title of that Nature, to which they do not originally and properly belong, are (by a fort of Catachrefis) predicated of the fame Subject confider'd in a different Capacity, merely to avoid the Inconveniency of giving quite different Names or Titles to the fame Subject, at the fame time, upon the account of the different Capacitys 'tis confidered in.

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An Example or two will make this Matter obvious to the meaneft Reader. St. Paul fays, Without Controversy great is the mystery of godliness: God was manifest in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, feen of Angels, preached unto the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up into glory, 1 Tim. 3, 16. In this Paffage God is the Subject. For why? Being manifefted in the Flesh is moft truly affirmed of God; and in order to express this Affirmation, God muft needs be the Subject. And the principal View the Apofile had, was to reprefent, the Greatness of the Myftery of Godliness, of which the Manifeftation of God in the Flefh was the moft evident Demonftration, But then, because the Manifeftation of God in the Flesh was not the whole of that Myftery, but diverfe other Particulars, did moft justly deferve, our Notice, which are all of them true of that compounded Perfon, who is juftly styled God by reafon of his Divine Nature; therefore the Apoftle continues the Predicat without altering the M 3 Name

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Name of the Subject, and proceeds to affirm of him (tho' thofe Affirmations regard him not as God, but as Man; that is, because he was God manifefted in the Flefh, or God-Man) that he was juftified in the Spirit, feen of Angels, preached unto the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up into glory; that is, the Man Chrift Jefus (even the other Nature united to God, and become one and the fame Perfon with God, and therefore fufficiently pointed at under the Name of the fuperior Nature) was juftified, or demonftrated to be what he pretended, in or by the Spirit,

Again, St. Paul fays, that God hath tranflated us into the kingdom of his dear Son. In whom we have redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness of fins. Who is the image of the invifible God, the first-born of every creature. For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, vifible and invifible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him, &c. Col. 1. 13, &c. You fee, the Subject is God's Son; and Chrift is undoubtedly God's Son as to his Human Nature. And the first thing affirmed of God's Son is, that in him we have redemption through bis blood, which manifeftly relates to his Human Nature. Twas therefore neceffary, that the Subject fhould be denoted by fome Name or Title which belonged to him as Man. But then, because the principal View of the Apoftle, in that glorious Character which follows, was to reprefent the Dignity of that Man, through whofe Bloud we have Redemption; therefore he proceeds to affirm (by way of Predicat to the fame Subject) fuch things of God's Son, as manifeftly relate to his Divine Nature, and can't poffibly be understood of, or relate

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167 late to, his Human Nature; faying exprefly, that by bim were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invifible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him. That is, the A poftle affirms fuch things of him, whom he at first characterizes as a Man, which can be true of him only as he is God.

Briefly then, whenfoever our Lord is spoken of under the Name or Title of a Man, we muft underftand his Human Nature only; and when he is fpoken of under the Name or Title of God, we muft understand his Divine Nature only except we are obliged to do otherwife for the Reafons already given. That is, we muft always restrain (when the Context and Circumftances will permit) what is refpectively spoken of each Nature, to the Nature it properly belongs to, confidered not as actually feparated from, but only as it is in it felf really diftinct from, tho' at the fame time infeparably united to, the other Nature. For, as I have already obferved, none of the feveral Names or Titles given in the Holy Scriptures to our Savior, does include or denote his two Natures united in one Perfon but each of them does refpectively fignify that Nature, upon the account of which it does originally appertain to him.

By this great Numbers of Texts become perfectly intelligible, and confiderable Difficultys are very eafily removed. For if this Rule be duly observed, many Paffages will inftantly appear to be fpoken of the Man Chrift Jefus only, without any Regard to the WORD or Divine Nature, which, if understood of the WORD or Divine Nature, or of the whole God-Man, would really imply, that the WORD

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