Ṛig-Veda-sanhitá: A Collection of Ancient Hindu Hymns, Volume 1

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N. Trübner, 1866 - 348 pages

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Contents

I
v
II
1
III
11
IV
20
V
29
VI
41
VII
45
VIII
79
XIV
155
XV
166
XVI
177
XVII
197
XVIII
207
XIX
219
XX
242
XXI
246

IX
89
X
100
XI
118
XII
126
XIII
135
XXII
275
XXIII
296
XXV
306
XXVI
325

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Page xxiii - Kusa, or sacred grass, strewed on the floor ; and in all cases the residue was drunk by the assistants. The ceremony takes place in the dwelling of the worshipper, in a chamber appropriated to the purpose and probably to the maintenance of a perpetual fire, although the frequent allusions to the occasional kindling of the sacred flame are rather at variance with this practice.
Page 17 - INDRA,—whether he come from verted to, of the Asuras named Panis having stolen the cows of the gods, or, according to some versions, of the Angirasas, and hidden them in a cave, where they were discovered by Indra, with the help of the bitch Saramd.
Page xxv - R'ibhus, elevated for their piety to the rank of divinities. Protection against evil spirits (Rdkshasas) is also requested, and in one or two passages Yama and his office, as ruler of the dead, are obscurely alluded to. There is little demand for moral benefactions...
Page xxvi - SIVA,— the wearing of his hair in a peculiar braid: but the term has, probably, in the Veda, a different signification, —one now forgotten,—although it may have suggested, in after time, the appearance of S'IVA, in such a headdress, as identified with AGNI.
Page xxv - There is little demand for moral benefactions, although in some few instances hatred of untruth and abhorrence of sin are expressed, a hope is uttered that the latter may be repented of or expiated, and the gods are in one hymn solicited to extricate the worshipper from sin of every kind. The main objects of the prayers, however, are benefits of a more worldly and physical character : the tone in which these are requested indicates a quiet confidence in their being granted, as a return for the benefits...
Page 281 - Let no father, who knows the law, receive a gratuity, however small, for giving his daughter in marriage ; since the man who, through avarice, takes a gratuity for that purpose, is a seller of his offspring.
Page 214 - Slayer of VRITRA, ascend thy chariot, for thy horses have been yoked by prayer; may the stone (that bruises the Soma) attract, by its sound, thy mind towards us. 4. Drink, INDRA, this excellent, immortal, exhilarating libation, the drops of which pellucid (beverage) flow towards thee in the chamber of sacrifice. 5. Offer worship quickly to INDRA; recite hymns (in his praise); let the effused drops exhilarate him; pay adoration to his superior strength.
Page 307 - Three nights and three days, NASATYAS, have you conveyed BHUJYU, in three rapid, revolving cars, having a hundred wheels, and drawn by six horses," along the dry bed of the ocean, to the shore of the sea.
Page 128 - Aurora : the metre is the same as in the preceding. in. 1. USHAS, daughter of heaven, dawn upon us with riches: diffuser of light, dawn upon us with abundant food: bountiful goddess, dawn upon us with wealth (of cattle). 2. Abounding with horses, abounding with kine, bestowers of every sort of wealth/ (the divinities of morning) are possessed of much that is necessary for the habitations (of men): USHAS, speak to me kind words : send us the affluence of the wealthy. 3. The divine USHAS has dwelt...
Page 71 - The stone, or, rather, here, perhaps, the stone pestle, is that which is used to bruise the Soma plants, and so express the juice. The pestle employed in bruising or threshing grain is, usually, of heavy wood. for containing the juice,—as (broad as a woman's) hips,—are employed, recognize and partake of the effusions of the mortar.

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