Works, Volume 13

Front Cover
J. Stockdale, 1807
 

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Contents

De Idyllio Arabico 60 CAPUT III De Idyllio Arabico CAPUT IV De Carmine Persico
79
On the Estate of Pyrrhus
83
De Imaginibus Poeticis
98
The Sixth Anniverſary Diſcourſe on the Perſians
103
On the Estate of Nicostratus
109
De Translatione
118
Deſcription allégorique du printemps pour lannée 1728
126
Affaires des Afgans dHérat
128
The Seventh Anniverſary Diſcourſe on the Chineſe
137
Expédition dEcheref contre le Kho raflan bataille de Mehmandoft
138
De Comparatione
140
Sur ce qui arrive dans cet intervalle
142
On the Estate of Dicæogenes 122 SPEECH IV On the Estate of Dicæogenes
143
Bataille de Serdé khar
144
La bataille de Mourtchekort
146
Isfahan recouvré
152
De reliquis Figuris
156
The Eighth Anniverſary Diſcourſe on the Borderers
162
Overture de lannée 1729
164
Preface
165
On the Estate of Apollodorus
168
Commencement de la guerre avec les Turcs priſe de Nehavend
169
Conquête dHamadan de Kerman chahan
171
De arcana Poematum Significatione
173
Larmée marche vers Tauris
176
Nader ſe rend maître de Demdem de Merghé de Tauris
180
The Ninth Anniverſary Diſcourſe on the Origin
185
On the Estate of Ciron
187
De Elato dicendi genere
189
Larmée marche vers le Khoraffan pour punir les Afgans
192
Of Vowels
193
Ce qui arrive à Mechehed
195
Dedication
197
Of Nouns and first of Genders
199
Premières actions de lannée 1730
200
De Venustate
203
The Tenth Anniverſary Diſcourſe on Aſiatick Hiſ
205
Solima an Arabian Eclogue
206
On the Estate of Astyphilus
208
Siege de Ferah
210
Révolte dAllagar Khan
216
Bataille de Kebouterkhan
218

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Page 268 - Wrapt in' eternal solitary shade, Th' impenetrable gloom of light intense, Impervious, inaccessible, immense, Ere spirits were infus'd or forms display'd, BREHM his own Mind survey'd, As mortal eyes (thus finite we compare With infinite) in smoothest mirrors gaze : Swift, at his look, a shape supremely fair Leap'd into being with a boundless blaze, That fifty suns might daze. Primeval Maya was the Goddess nam'd, Who to her sire, with Love divine inflam'd, A casket gave with rich Ideas fill'd, From...
Page 271 - Whence ev'ry object ev'ry moment flows : Suns hence derive their force, Hence planets learn their course ; But suns and fading worlds I view no more : GOD only I perceive ; GOD only I adore.
Page 221 - O DURGA', thou hast deign'd to shield Man's feeble virtue with celestial might, Gliding from yon jasper field, And, on a lion borne, hast brav'd the fight ; For, when the demon Vice thy realms defied, And arm'd with death each arched horn, Thy golden lance, O goddess mountain-born, Touch but the pest — He roar'd and died.
Page 246 - Arun, loveliest o£Vinatian race, Though younger He, whom Madhava bestrides, When high on eagle-plumes he rides : But oh ! what pencil of a living star Could paint that gorgeous car, In which, as in an ark supremely bright, The lord of boundless light Ascending calm o'er th' empyrean sails, And with ten thousand beams his awful beauty veils.
Page 237 - They with the ruddy flash, that points his thunder, ' Rend his vain bands asunder. ' Th' exulting God resumes his thousand eyes, ' Four arms divine, and robes of changing dyes...
Page 204 - Calidasa, who flourished in the court of Vicramaditya, fifty-seven years before Christ. He wrote several dramas, one of which, entitled Sacontala, is in my possession; and the subject of it appears to be as interesting as the composition is beautiful : besides these he published the...
Page 329 - What the sun and light are to this visible world, that are the Supreme Good and Truth to the intellectual and invisible universe ; and as our corporeal eyes have a distinct perception of objects enlightened by the sun, thus our souls acquire certain knowledge by meditating on the light of truth, which emanates from the Being of beings ; that is the light by which alone our minds can be directed in the path to beatitude.
Page 183 - He ceas'd : the living gold upsprung, And from the bank ten cubits hung. Embolden'd by this fair success, Next Erjun hasten'd to confess : ' When I with Aswatthama fought ; * My noose the fell assassin caught ; ' My spear transfix'd him to the ground: ' His giant limbs firm cordage bound : * His holy thread extorted awe ' Spar'd by religion and by law ; ' But, when his murd'rous hands I view'd * In blameless kindred gore imbued, ' Fury my boiling bosom sway'd, * And Rage unsheath'd my willing blade...
Page 248 - What mortal pours the strain?' Say (for thou seest earth, air, and main) Say: 'From the bosom of yon silver isle. Where skies more softly smile. He came; and, lisping our celestial tongue Though not from Brahma sprung, Draws orient knowledge from its fountains pure. Through caves obstructed long, and paths too long obscure.
Page 231 - Dwaipayana, or Dwelling in an Island; who, if he really composed the Gita, makes very flattering mention of himself in the tenth chapter. The plant Lata, which he describes weaving a net round the mountain...

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