Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

See the bwildinge.

[Page 56 of MS.]

This song is to be found in the Roxburghe Collection of Black-letter Ballads, I. 454, with the title “A well-wishing to a place of pleasure. To an excellent new tune,” and with six more lines in each stanza. We quote it here for contrast sake.

A WELL-WISHING TO A PLACE OF PLEASURE.

To an excellent new Tune.

See the building
Where whilst my mistris lived in

Was pleasures essence,
See how it droopeth
And how nakedly it looketh

Without her presence :
? Every creature
That appertaines to nature

'bout this house living, Doth resemble, If not dissemble,

due praises giving.? Harke, how the hollow Windes do blow

And seem to murmur in every corner, for her long absence : The which doth plainly show The causes why I do now All this grief and sorrow show.

Flora springing
Is erer bringing

Dame Venus ease.2
Oh see the Arbour where that she

with melting kisses

distilling blisses From her true selfe

with joy did ravish me. The pretty nightingale

did sing melodiously.

Haile to those groves
Where I injoyde those loves

so many dayes.
Let the flowers be springing,
And sweet birds ever singing

their Roundelayes, ? Many Cupids measures And cause for true Loves pleasures,

Be dancd around,
Let all contentment
For mirth's presentment

this day be found ? : And may the grass grow ever green

where we two lying

have oft been trying More severall wayes

than beauties lovely Queen When she in bed with Mars

by all the gods was seen.

See the garden
Where I receivde reward in

for my true love : Behold those places Where I receivde those graces

the Gods might move. 2 The Queene of plenty With all the fruits are dainty,

delights to please

| Not inelegant.-P. Note on a separate slip of paper :

“This was once a very popular song, as appears from a parody of it inserted (as a solemn piece of music) in Hemming's

Jew's Tragedy, act 4, 4to, 1662.-N.B. The marginal corrections are made from this Parody.”—P.

3-2 Not in the Percy Folio copy.-F.

Mr. W. Chappell says that the “excellent new tune of this song was adopted for other songs.”

[blocks in formation]

SEE the building which whilest' my Mistress lined in

was pleasures asseince 2 !
see how it droopeth, & how Nakedly it looketh

with-out her presence!
heearke how the hollow winds doe blowe,

& how thé 3 Murmer in every corner
for her being absent, from whence they cheefly grow !
the cause that I doe now this greeffe & sorrow showe.

8

See the garden where we have loved,

12

See the garden where oft I had reward in

for my trew loue !
see the places where I enioyed those graces

they goddes might moue !
oft in this arbour, whiles that shee

with melting kisses disstilling blisses
through my frayle lipps, what Ioy did ravish me!
the pretty Nightingale did sing Melodiouslee.

the arbour where we kissed,

16

and the groves! Blessings on them;

20

Haile to those groves where wee ínioyed our loues

soe many daies !
May the trees be springing, & the pretty burds be

singing
theire Roundelayes !
Oh !
may
the
grasse

be euer greene
wheron wee, lying, haue oft beene tryinge
More seuerall wayes of pleasure then loues queene,
which once in bedd with Mars by all the godds was

and on the grass where we lay!

24

seene.

lling

[half a page missing. ]

1 where once.-P.
2 With pleasure's essence.-P.

3 they.-P.
* MS. cheesly.--F.

the.-P.

Walking in a Meadow gren.

[Page 93 of MS.]

Perhaps the following may have been suggested by the ballad of “The Two Leicestershire Lovers; to the tune of And yet methinks I love thee," a copy of which is in the Roxburghe Collection, I. 412. The subject of each is two lovers; both poems are in nearly the same metre, and begin with the same line. The difference is in the after-treatment. The “ Two Leicestershire Lovers” begins thus :

Walking in a meadow green

For recreation's sake,
To drive away some sad thoughts

That sorrowful did me make,
I spied two lovely lovers,

Did hear each other's woe,
To 'point a place of meeting

Upon the meadow brow.

This was printed by John Trundle, at the sign of “ The Nobody," in Barbican—the ballad-publisher immortalized by Ben Jonson in his “Every Man in his Humour.” (* Well, if he read this with patience, I'll go and troll ballads for Master John Trundle yonder, the rest of my mortality.”) The printed copy is therefore as old as the manuscript.-W. C.

Walking out,

WALKING in a meadowe greene,

fayre flowers for to gather,
where p[r]imrose rankes did stand on bankes

to welcome comers thither,

4

« PreviousContinue »