Westminster Abbey: Its Architecture, History and Monuments, Volume 1

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Duffield, 1914 - 864 pages

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Page 191 - The eclipse of Nature spreads my pall, — The majesty of darkness shall Receive my parting ghost ! "This spirit shall return to Him Who gave its heavenly spark ; Yet, think not, Sun, it shall be dim When thou thyself art dark ! No ! it shall live again, and shine In bliss unknown to beams of thine, By Him recall'd to breath, Who captive led captivity, Who robb'd the grave of Victory, — And took the sting from Death...
Page 165 - With all his faults — and they were neither few nor small — only one cemetery was worthy to contain his remains. In that temple of silence and reconciliation, where the enmities of twenty generations lie buried...
Page 339 - And on it have bestow*d more contrite tears, Than from it issued forced drops of blood. Five hundred poor I have in yearly pay, Who twice a day their...
Page 160 - ... and outstretched arm, to bid England be of good cheer, and to hurl defiance at her foes. The generation which reared that memorial of him has disappeared. The time has come when the rash and indiscriminate judgments which his contemporaries passed on his character may be calmly revised by history. And history, while, for the warning of vehement, high, and daring natures, she notes his many errors, will yet deliberately pronounce, that, among the eminent men whose bones lie near his, scarcely...
Page 216 - Dr. Busby ! a great man ! he whipped my grandfather ; a very great man ! I should have gone to him myself, if I had not been a blockhead : a very great man !' " We were immediately conducted into the little chapel on the right hand.
Page 370 - and tell you a truth, which perchance you will marvel at. One of the greatest benefits that ever God gave me, is, that he sent me so sharp and severe parents, and so gentle a schoolmaster. For when I am in presence...
Page 146 - ... yawns: the mortal disappears; Ashes to ashes, dust to dust; He is gone who seem'd so great. Gone; but nothing can bereave him Of the force he made his own Being here, and we believe him Something far advanced in State, And that he wears a truer crown Than any wreath that man can weave him. Speak no more of his renown, Lay your earthly fancies down, And in the vast cathedral leave him. God accept him, Christ receive him.
Page 370 - ... else; I must do it, as it were, in such weight, measure, and number, even so perfectly, as God made the world; or else I am so sharply taunted, so cruelly threatened, yea presently sometimes with pinches, nips, and bobs, and other ways (which I will not name for the honour I bear them) so without measure misordered, that I think myself in hell, till time come that I must go to Mr.
Page 154 - Malcom, Land, rediv. INSCRIPTION ON A MONUMENT ALLUDED TO IN THE SKETCH Here lyes the Loyal Duke of Newcastle, and his Duchess his second wife, by whom he had no issue. Her name was Margaret Lucas, youngest sister to the Lord Lucas of Colchester, a noble family ; for all the brothers were valiant, and all the sisters virtuous.
Page 199 - No more the Grecian muse unrivall'd reigns, To Britain let the nations homage pay : She felt a Homer's fire in Milton's strains, A Pindar's rapture in the lyre of Gray.

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