Epures d'architecture: De la coupe des pierres a la géométrie descriptive XVI - XIX siècles

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Springer Science & Business Media, 1998 M06 16 - 428 pages

This is an elegant and profound homage to the discipline of descriptive geometry. Sterile classroom lectures on the subject have long been the bane of engineering and architecture students and now it is widely thought that CAD (computer-aided design) may be giving the coup de grâce to this special branch of geometry. And yet modern graphics techniques are unthinkable today without the foundation that descriptive geometry provides. The author traces the discipline's evolution from the 16th through to the 19th century, starting with an examination of how it served the early art of stone-cutting, and moving on to studying its relationship to pure geometry and its curricular importance to the Ecole Polytechnique established by the National Convention. Descriptive geometry is the point of juncture between the theoretical and the practical, between thought and action. A knowing and expansive selection of architectural drawings demonstrates this beautifully throughout the work. The drawings are the readable imprints of man's three-dimensional imagination; the maps which give us the wherewithal to turn the space he invents into physical reality.

 

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Contents

I
1
II
15
III
21
IV
35
V
51
VI
81
VII
95
VIII
97
XVI
179
XVII
185
XVIII
189
XIX
210
XX
216
XXI
225
XXII
243
XXIII
279

IX
111
X
133
XI
149
XII
157
XIII
170
XIV
173
XV
177
XXIV
281
XXV
283
XXVI
295
XXVII
315
XXVIII
339
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Page ii - Demidov, Moskva EA Fellmann, Basel M. Folkerts, München P. Galison, Cambridge, Mass. I. Grattan-Guinness, London J. Gray, Milton Keynes R. Halleux, Liege S. Hildebrandt, Bonn E. Knobloch, Berlin D. Laugwitz,
Page ii - Edited by Erwin Hiebert and Hans Wussing Editorial Board: K. Anderson, Aarhus D. Barkan, Pasadena HJM Bos, Utrecht U. Bottazzini, Roma JZ Buchwald, Cambridge, Mass. K. Chemla, Paris
Page v - Marco Polo décrit un pont, pierre par pierre. - Mais laquelle est la pierre qui soutient le pont? demande Kublai Khan. - Le pont

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