Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time, and capable of perpetual renovation. Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking... "
Lectures Upon Shakspeare - Page 41
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
Limited preview - About this book

The British Plutarch: Containing the Lives of the Most Eminent ..., Volume 2

Francis Wrangham - 1816
...are they fitly to be called ' images,' because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast sea of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions,...
Full view - About this book

The British Plutarch: Containing the Lives of the Most Eminent ..., Volume 2

Francis Wrangham - 1816
...are they fitly to be called ' images,' because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast sea of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions,...
Full view - About this book

The Leodiensian; or Leeds grammar school magazine

Leeds grammar sch - 1828
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions, in succeeding ages." So much for the pleasures of learning : now hear what he saith of the advantages thereof':— " It is...
Full view - About this book

Lectures on General Literature, Poetry, &c., Delivered at the Royal ...

James Montgomery - 1833 - 324 pages
...in their way, they generate still, and cast forth seeds in the minds of men, raising and procreating infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages; so that, if the invention of a ship was thought so noble and wonderful, — which transports riches and merchandise from place to...
Full view - About this book

The Eclectic Review

1833
...in their way, they generate still, and cast forth seeds in the minds of men, raising and procreating infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages ; so that, if the invention of a ship was thought so noble and wonderful, — which transports riches and merchandise from place to...
Full view - About this book

The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th]

1833
...in their way, they generate still, and cast forth seeds in the minds of men, raising and procreating infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages; so that, if the invention of a ship was thought so noble and wonderful,—which transports riches and merchandise from place to...
Full view - About this book

The Southern literary messenger, Volume 16

1850
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrietb riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition:

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1825
...perturbations, labours, and " wanderings up and down of other men." 8. Learning insures immortality .... 87 //' the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities frons place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how...
Full view - About this book

Memoirs of the life of ... sir James Mackintosh [extr. from ..., Volume 1

sir James Mackintosh - 1835
...communion of wisdom and wise men throughout all ages and nations of the world. ' If,' says Lord Bacon, ' the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which...through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other !' Alas I gentlemen...
Full view - About this book

Memoirs of the Life of Sir James Mackintosh, Volume 1

Sir James Mackintosh - 1836
...and wise men throughout all ages and nations of the world. ' If,' says Lord Bacon, ' the intention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches...through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other!' Alas! gentlemen; what...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search