Early Life and Letters of General Thomas J. Jackson: "Stonewall" Jackson

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Fleming H. Revell Company, 1916 - 379 pages
 

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Page 51 - God calling unto mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my Soul into the hand of Almighty God that gave it and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the discretion of my executors nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God...
Page 51 - Nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God. And as touching such worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me in this life I give, demise, and dispose of the same in the following manner and form...
Page 349 - GENERAL: I have just received your note, informing me that you were wounded. I cannot express my regret at the occurrence. Could I have directed events, I should have chosen, for the good of the country, to have been disabled in your stead. I congratulate you upon the victory which is due to your skill and energy.
Page 346 - His complete control, too, over his mind, enfeebled as it was by loss of blood, pain, &c., was wonderful. His suffering at this time was intense, his hands were cold, his skin clammy, his face pale, and his lips compressed and bloodless. Not a groan escaped him, not a sign of suffering, except the slight corrugation of his brow, the fixed rigid face, and the thin lips, so tightly compressed. that the impression of the teeth could be seen through them. Except these, he controlled, by his...
Page 345 - I knelt down by him, and said, " I hope you are not badly hurt, General." He replied very calmly, but feebly, '' I am badly injured, Doctor ; I fear I am dying." After a pause, he continued, " I am glad you have come." I think the wound in my shoulder is still bleeding.
Page 116 - Having turned the forest on the west, and arriving opposite to the north centre of Chapultepec, Worth came up with the troops in the road, under Colonel Trousdale, and aided by a flank movement of a part of Garland's brigade, in taking the one-gun breastwork, then under the fire of Lieutenant Jackson's section of Captain Magruder's field battery.
Page 345 - His suffering at this time was intense; his hands were cold, his skin clammy, his face pale, and his lips compressed and bloodless; not a groan escaped him — not a sign of suffering, except the slight corrugation of his brow, the fixed, rigid face, and the thin lips so tightly...
Page 355 - Breckinridge (who with Dr. Smith had been sent for in consultation) said he hoped that a blister which had been applied would afford him relief, he expressed his own confidence in it, and in his final recovery. Dr. Tucker, from Richmond, arrived on Saturday, and all that human skill could devise was done to stay the hand of death.
Page 333 - The general asked him to stop at his headquarters for a few days before joining his company, and he slept and messed with us. We all became much attached to the young fellow, and Jackson, in his gentle, winning way, did his best to make him feel at home and at his ease; the lad's manners were so gentle, kindly and diffident, and his beardless, blue-eyed, boyish face so manly and so handsome.
Page 352 - Hotchkiss, with a party of engineers, was sent in front to clear the road of wood, stone, etc., and to order the wagons out of the track to let the ambulance pass. The rough teamsters sometimes refused to move their loaded wagons out of the way for an ambulance, until told that it contained Jackson, and then, with all possible speed, they gave the way, and stood with hats off, and weeping, as he went by.

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