A New General Biographical Dictionary, Volume 5

Front Cover
B. Fellowes, 1853
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 57 - Chemistry, Meteorology, and the Function of Digestion, considered with reference to Natural Theology.
Page 280 - VINDICATION OF NATURAL SOCIETY: OR, A VIEW OF THE MISERIES AND EVILS ARISING TO MANKIND FROM EVERY SPECIES OF ARTIFICIAL SOCIETY. IN A LETTER TO LORD ****. BY A LATE NOBLE WRITER.
Page 110 - Harrison, preaching against bishops, ceremonies, ecclesiastical courts, ordaining of ministers, &c. for which $ as he afterwards boasted, he had been committed to thirty-two prisons, in some of which he could not see his hand at noon-day.
Page 115 - His style is, indeed, a tissue of many languages ; a mixture of heterogeneous words, brought together from distant regions, with terms originally appropriated to one art, and drawn by violence into the service of another.
Page 219 - HE appeared in countenance to be of a stern and rough temper; but in his conversation mild and affable; not given to loquacity, or much discourse in company, unless some urgent occasion required it; observing never to boast of himself, or his parts, but rather seem low in his own eyes, and submit himself to the judgment of others...
Page 271 - Wilson's Illustration of the Method of explaining the New Testament, by the early opinions of Jews and Christians concerning Christ.
Page 314 - I think I have given you the very soul of his Character when I have told you that his talent lies at Collection. He has melted down the best of our English Histories into Twelve-penny Books, which are filled with wonders, rarities, and curiosities; for you must know, his Title-pages, are a little swelling".
Page 115 - ... and his combinations uncouth. He fell into an age in which our language began to lose the stability which it had obtained in the time of Elizabeth ; and was considered by every writer as a subject on which he might try his plastic skill, by moulding it according to his own fancy.
Page 83 - You will feel it as a compliment if I say that the result of our meeting may be the most grateful service I can render to my country; and I doubt not that you, equally confident of success, will feel convinced that it is only by repeated triumphs, in even combats, that your little navy can now hope to console your country for the loss of that trade it can no longer protect. Favour me with a speedy reply. We are short of provisions and water, and cannot stay long here.
Page 114 - ... which he does not discover some skill ; and scarce any kind of knowledge, profane or sacred, abstruse or elegant, which he does not appear to have cultivated with success. His exuberance of knowledge, and plenitude of ideas, sometimes obstruct the tendency of his reasoning and the clearness of his decisions: on whatever subject he employed his mind, there started up immediately so many images before him, that he lost one by grasping another. His memory supplied him with so many illustrations,...

Bibliographic information