A Statistical Account, Or, Parochial Survey of Ireland: Drawn Up from the Communications of the Clergy, Volume 3

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Graisberry and Campbell, 1819
 

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Page 619 - Far from me and my friends be such frigid philosophy as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the ruins of lona.
Page 619 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Page 618 - We were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge., and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate...
Page 364 - ... he would never desire any gentleman of parts and learning to employ his time in celebrating a ministry who had neither the justice or generosity t
Page 76 - Speak ye unto all the congregation of Israel, saying, In the tenth day of this month they shall take to them every man a lamb, according to the house of their fathers, a lamb for an house...
Page 358 - Goldsmith was always plain in his appearance, but when a boy, and immediately after suffering heavily with the small-pox, he was particularly ugly. When he was about seven years old, a fiddler, who reckoned himself a wit, happened to be playing to some company in Mrs. Goldsmith's house; during a pause between the country-dances, little Oliver surprised the party by jumping up suddenly, and dancing round the room.
Page 602 - Our calmer judgment will rather tend to moderate than to suppress the pride of an ancient and worthy race. The satirist may laugh, the philosopher may preach ; but Reason herself will respect the prejudices and habits which have been consecrated by the experience of mankind.
Page 619 - Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery...
Page 618 - The losses of history, indeed," says Gibbon, "are irretrievable; when the productions of fancy or science have been swept away, new poets may invent, and new philosophers may reason ; but, if the inscription of a single fact be once obliterated, it cannot be restored by the united efforts of genius and industry. The consideration of our past losses should invite the present age to cherish and perpetuate the valuable relics which have escaped.
Page 364 - Treasurer calmly replied, That he would seriously consider of what his Lordship had said, and endeavour to give no Occasion for such Reproaches...

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