The Beauties of Ireland: Being Original Delineations, Topographical, Historical, and Biographical, of Each County, Volume 2

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Sherwood, Jones, & Company, 1826
 

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Page 463 - Thus every good his native wilds impart, Imprints the patriot passion on his heart; And e'en those ills, that round his mansion rise, Enhance the bliss his scanty fund supplies. Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms, And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms; And as a child, when scaring sounds molest, Clings close and closer to the mother's breast, So the loud torrent, and the whirlwind's roar, But bind him to his native mountains more.
Page 268 - The first design of this Essay was his : — under the semblance of attack, he wished to show the English public the eloquence, wit, and talents of the lower classes of people in Ireland. Working zealously upon the ideas which he suggested, sometimes, what was spoken by him, was afterwards written by me ; or when I wrote my first thoughts, they were corrected and improved by him ; so that no book was ever written more completely in partnership. On this, as on most subjects, whether light or serious,...
Page 177 - All of us who had the happiness of her friendship agreed unanimously, that, in an afternoon or evening's conversation, she never failed, before we parted, of delivering the best thing that was said in the company. Some of us have written down several of her sayings, or what the French call bans mots, wherein she excelled beyond belief!
Page 295 - The following inscriptions are graven on the dies of the pedestal: " Sacred to the glorious Memory of King William the Third, who, on the first of July, 1690, passed the river, near this place, to attack James the Second, at the head of a Popish army, advantageously posted on the south side of it, and did on that day, by a successful battle, secure to us and to our posterity our liberty, laws, and religion. In consequence of this action James the Second left this kingdom, and fled to France.
Page 271 - She heard them at the gate, and expected that they would have broken in the next instant. But one, who seemed to be a leader, with a pike in his hand, set his back against the gate, and swore that, if he was to die for it the next minute, he would have the life of the first man who should open that gate, or set enemy's foot within side of that place.
Page 74 - In this sequestered spot, according to the old gardener's account, the Dean and Vanessa used often to sit, with books and writing materials on the table before them.
Page 140 - it is about a mile and a half in length, and a quarter of a mile broad ; and being defended, to the northward, by the...
Page 486 - Sabbath day with neat, orderly, and religious people, as it would comfort any good heart to see the change, and behold such assemblies; no popish recusant or unconforming novelist being admitted to live in all the town.
Page 177 - She never had the least absence of mind in conversation, nor given to interruption, or appeared eager to put in her word, by waiting impatiently until another had done. She spoke in a most agreeable voice, in the plainest words, never hesitating, except out of modesty before new faces, where she was somewhat reserved ; nor, among her nearest friends, ever spoke much at a time. She was but...
Page 74 - ... was always melancholy, save when Dean Swift was there, and then she seemed happy. The garden was to an uncommon degree crowded with laurels. The old man said that when Miss Vanhomrigh expected the Dean, she always planted, with her own hand, a laurel or two against his arrival. He showed her favourite seat, still called Vanessa's Bower.

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