A Modern Pyramid: To Commemorate E Septuagint of Worthies

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J. Rickerby, 1839 - 322 pages
 

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Page 304 - I cannot name this gentleman without remarking, that his labours and writings have done much to open the eyes and hearts of mankind. He has visited all Europe, — not to survey the sumptuousness of palaces, or the stateliness of temples ; not to make accurate measurements of the remains of ancient grandeur, nor to form a scale of the curiosity of modern art ; not to collect medals, or...
Page 187 - As concerning therefore the eating of those things that are offered in sacrifice unto idols, we know that an idol is nothing in the world, and that there is none other God but one.
Page 196 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among the ruins of lona.
Page 106 - A drought is upon her waters; and they shall be dried up: for it is the land of graven images, and they are mad upon their idols.
Page 187 - And if any man think that he knoweth any thing, he knoweth nothing yet as he ought to know.
Page 55 - O Lord, be gracious unto us; we have waited for thee: be thou their arm every morning, our salvation also in the time of trouble.
Page 56 - The burden of the word of the Lord in the land of Hadrach, and Damascus shall be the rest thereof: when the eyes of man, as of all the tribes of Israel, shall be toward the Lord.
Page 34 - And Joseph bought all the land of Egypt for Pharaoh; for the Egyptians sold every man his field, because the famine prevailed over them: so the land became Pharaoh's.
Page 226 - Thy soul was nerved with more than mortal force, Bold mariner upon a chartless sea, With none to second, none to solace thee. Alone, who daredst keep thy resolute course Through the broad waste of waters drear and dark, 'Mid wrathful skies, and howling winds, and worse, — The prayer, the taunt, the threat, the muttered curse Of all thy brethren in that fragile bark...
Page 149 - Guard them, and him within protect from harms. He can requite thee; for he knows the charms That call fame on such gentle acts as these, And he can spread thy name o'er lands and seas, Whatever clime the sun's bright circle warms. Lift not thy spear against the Muses

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