The Universal Magazine, Volume 24

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Pub. for J. Hinton., 1759
 

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Page 351 - Let us consider that youth is of no long duration, and that in maturer age, when the enchantments of fancy shall cease, and Phantoms of delight dance no more about us, we shall have no comforts but the esteem of wise men, and the means of doing Good.
Page 236 - my history will not be long: the life that is devoted to knowledge passes silently away, and is very little diversified by events. To talk in public, to think in solitude, to read and to hear, to inquire and answer inquiries, is the business of a scholar. He wanders about the world without pomp or terror, and is neither known nor valued but by men like himself.
Page 235 - Nile through all his passage; pass over to distant regions, and examine the face of nature from one extremity of the earth to the other!
Page 238 - Being now resolved to be a poet, I saw every thing with a new purpose; my sphere of attention was suddenly magnified: no kind of knowledge was to be overlooked. I ranged mountains and deserts for images and resemblances, and pictured upon my mind every tree of the forest and flower of the valley. I observed with equal care the crags of the rock and the pinnacles of the palace. Sometimes I wandered along the mazes of the rivulet, and sometimes watched the changes of the summer clouds.
Page 234 - Amhara, surrounded . on every side by mountains, of which the summits overhang the middle part. The only passage by which it could be entered was a cavern that passed under a rock, of which it has long been disputed whether it was the work of nature or of human industry. The...
Page 235 - should you envy others so great an advantage? All skill ought to be exerted for universal good; every man has owed much to others and ought to repay the kindness that he has received.
Page 236 - But what would be the security of the good if the bad could at pleasure invade them from the sky? Against an army sailing through the clouds, neither walls nor mountains nor seas could afford any security. A flight of northern savages might hover in the wind and light at once with irresistible violence upon the capital of a fruitful region that was rolling under them.
Page 235 - I should with great alacrity teach them all to fly. But what would be the security of the good, if the bad could at pleasure invade them from the sky ? Against an army sailing through the clouds neither walls, nor mountains, nor seas, could afford any security. A flight of northern savages might hover in the wind, and light at once with irresistible violence upon the capital...
Page 235 - ... migration of wings ; that the fields of air are open to knowledge, and that only ignorance and idleness need crawl upon the ground.
Page 235 - But the exercise of swimming, said the prince, is very laborious : the strongest limbs are soon wearied. I am afraid the act of flying will be yet more violent ; and wings will be of no great use, unless we can fly further than we can swim.

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