A L'abri: Or The Tent Pitch'd

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S. Colman, 1839 - 172 pages
 

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Page 48 - Genius," says the best philosophical book I know of, " wherever it is found, and to whatever purpose directed, is mental power. It distinguishes the man of fine phrensy, as Shakspeare expresses it, from the man of mere phrensy. It is a sort of instantaneous insight, that gives us knowledge without going to school for it. Sometimes it is directed to one subject, sometimes to another ; but under whatever form it exhibits itself, it enables the individual who possesses it, to make a wonderful, and almost...
Page 150 - In literature we are no longer a distinct nation. The triumph of Atlantic steam navigation has driven the smaller drop into the larger, and London has become the centre. Farewell nationality ! The English language now marks the limits of a new literary empire, and America is a suburb. Our themes, our resources, the disappearing savage, and the retiring wilderness, the free...
Page 112 - ... as for a goddess, Who must be pillow'd, like high vesper, nightly On couch ethereal ! Be the curtains fleecy, Like vesper's fairest, when calm nights are breezy — Transparent, parting — showing what they hide, Or strive to veil — by mystery deified ! The floor, gold-carpet, that her zone and boddice May lie in honor where they gently fall, Slow loosened from her form symmetrical — Like mist from sunlight. Burn, sweet odors, burn ! For incense at the altar of her pleasure! Let music breathe...
Page 44 - I here begin comes to a finishing, it will be malgre blistering hands and weary back — the consequences of hard raking — of hay. The men are taking their four o'clock of cheese and cider in the meadow, and, not having simplified my digestion as rapidly as my habits, I have retired to the shelter of the bridge, to be decently rid of the master's first bit and pull at the pitcher. After employing my brains in vain, to discover why this particular branch of farming should require cider and cheese,...
Page 128 - Omega, put their steersmanship to the test ; and, when the leaves are off the trees, it is a curious sight to see the bulky monsters, shining with new boards, whirling around in the swift eddies, and, when caught by the current again, gliding off among the trees, like a singing and swearing phantom of an unfinished barn. At the village they take wheat and pork into the arks, load their rafts with plank and shingles, and wait for the return of the freshet. It is a fact you may not know, that, when...
Page 50 - With a tact of which the subtle ease and grace can in no way be conveyed into description, she gathered up the cobweb threads of conversation going on at different parts of the table, and, by the most apparent accident, flung them into Disraeli's fingers.
Page 171 - ... a messenger to carry her joy and her thanks up to the sun, because he had turned his beaming countenance again upon her in love and bounty. And the lark hung poised above the hope-giving field, and warbled her clear and joyous song.
Page 137 - wooding " at two or three places, however, and what with the excitement of the day, we were too fatigued to give more than a glance and a passing note of admiration to the beauty of the scene, and the next question was, how to come by Sancho's
Page 171 - THE Child walked forth alone upon the fresh, dewy corn-field. A thousand little suns glittered in his eyes, and a lark soared •warbling above his head. And the lark proclaimed the joys of the coming year, and awakened endless hopes, while she soared circling higher and higher, till, at length, her song was like the soft whisper of an angel holding converse with the spring, under the blue arch of heaven. The Child had seen...
Page 51 - ... D'Israeli on my mind as the most wonderful talker I have ever had the fortune to meet. He is anything but a declaimer. You would never think him on stilts. If he catches himself in a rhetorical sentence, he mocks at it in the next breath. He is satirical, contemptuous, pathetic, humorous, everything in a moment ; and his conversation on any subject whatever, embraces the omnibus rebus, et quibusdam aliis.

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