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deseription of the custom, which has prevailed for centuries, of the Jews going thither, and, before these reliques of their past greatness, and their temple’s glory, weeping over the destruction of the City, and the “ holy and beautiful house.”'

Dr. Robinson also takes particular notice of this spot, and of others where similar large stones are found. He measured one of those on the Eastern side of the Temple area, and found that it was twenty-four feet long, six feet broad, and three feet high. Those on the Western side are of similar dimensions.

The following is Dr. Robinson's account: “ The lower part of the wall is here composed of the same kind of ancient stones, which we had before seen on the Eastern side. Two old men, Jews, sat there upon the ground, reading together in a book of Hebrew prayers.

“ On Friday they assemble here in great numbers. It is the nearest point in which they can venture to approach their ancient temple ; and, fortunately for them, it is sheltered from observation by the narrowness of the land, and the dead walls around. Here, bowed in the dust, they may at least weep undisturbed over the fallen glory of their race; and bedew with their tears the soil which so many thousands of their forefathers once moistened with their blood.

“ This touching custom of the Jews is not of modern origin. Benjamin of Tudela mentions it, as connected apparently with the same spot, in the twelfth century; and very probably the custom has come down from still earlier ages. After the capture of Jerusalem under Adrian, the Jews were excluded from the city; and it was not till the age of Constantine that they were

permitted to approach so as to behold Jerusalem from the neighbouring hills. At length, they were allowed to enter the city once a year, on the day on which it was taken by Titus, in order to wail over the ruins of the Temple. But this privilege they were obliged to purchase of the Roman soldiers.”

Mr. Bartlett says, “ We repaired to the place on Friday, where a considerable number of Jews usually assemble. In the shadow of the wall were seated many venerable men, reading the book of the law, wearing out their declining days in the city of their fathers, and soon to be gathered to them in the valley of Jehoshaphat. There were also many women in their long white robes, who, as they entered the small area, walked along the sacred wall, kissing its ancient masonry, and praying through the crevices, with every appearance of deep devotion.”

Mr. Wilde, in his interesting narrative, says: “Nothing is so affecting as this scene, and years will never efface it from my remembrance. They (the Jews) stood in groups mourning and singing the Psalms of David, in the very places and in the very language in which David composed them; before those same walls which echoed them twenty-four centuries before ; their notes were mixed with sighs, or interrupted by sobs. They kissed the outer stones of the wall, but they could not enter within. The crescent of Islamism glittered on the pinnacles of the minaret, and the blood-red banner of Mahomet floated over their heads. If ever I should be asked what interested me most in my journey on the shores of the Mediterranean, I should answer, that it was the sight of the faithful Jew, weeping over the stones of Jerusalem.”

Thus do the children of Judah lament for the past, and weep over the present. Oh that they would turn to him, whose presence once made the glory of their latter temple greater than the glory of the former one! He lovingly invited their forefathers by his own voice, and now he invites them, on the same spot, by the ministers of his word. There the truth of his prediction respecting Jerusalem and her children is seen in all its terrible reality. There may the truth of his Gospel be felt in all its saving power!

ANCIENT PARABOLIC JEWISH HYMN. Few of our young readers imagine that the origin of some of the familiar rhyming puzzles of their nursery days is to be found in a Jewish service-book, in the form of a hymn, which is sung at the feast of Passover, and is intended to commemorate some of the principal events of their history.

The original is in the Chaldee Language, and is found in the Sepher Haggadah, fol. 23.

We give both the hymn and the interpretation, not as in themselves instructive, but curious, and as illustrating the fact that sometimes under absurd fables, a true history is hidden, and under an allegory a lesson of real instruction. 1. A kid, a kid my father bought, For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid.
2. Then came the cat, and ate the kid,

That my father bought,
For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid.

3. Then came the dog, and bit the cat,

That ate the kid,
That my father bought,
For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid.
4. Then came the staff, and beat the dog,

That bit the cat,
That ate the kid,
That my father bought,
For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid.
5. Then came the fire, and burned the staff,

That beat the dog,
That bit the cat,
That ate the kid,
That my father bought,
For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid. 6. Then came the water, and quenched the fire,

That burned the staff,
That beat the dog,
That bit the cat,
That ate the kid,
That my father bought,
For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid.
7. Then came the ox, and drank the water,

That quenched the fire,
That burned the staff,
That beat the dog,
That bit the cat,
That ate the kid,
That

my

father bought, For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid.
8. Then came the butcher, and slew the ox,

That drank the water,
That quenched the fire,
That burned the staff,

That beat the dog,
That bit the cat,
That ate the kid,
That my father bought,
For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid. 9. Then came the angel of death, and killed the butcher,

That slew the ox,
That drank the water,
That quenched the fire,
That burned the staff,
That beat the dog,
That bit the cat,
That ate the kid,
That my father bought,
For two pieces of money :

A kid, a kid.
10. Then came the Holy One, blessed be He!

And killed the angel of death,
That killed the butcher,
That slew the ox,
That drank the water,
That quenched the fire,
That burned the staff,
That beat the dog,
That bit the cat,
That ate the kid,
That my father bought,
For two pieces of money:

A kid, a kid.
The following is the interpretation :-

1. The kid, which was one of the pure animals, denotes the Hebrews.

The father, by whom it was purchased, is Jehovah, who represents himself as sustaining this relation to the Hebrew nation.

The two pieces of money, signify Moses and Aaron, through whose mediation the Hebrews were brought out of Egypt.

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