Our national vice

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Scottish Temperance League, 1858 - 171 pages
 

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Page 109 - And if thy right eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast it from thee : for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell.
Page 56 - But bring a Scotsman frae his hill, Clap in his cheek a Highland gill, Say, such is royal George's will, An' there's the foe, He has nae thought but how to kill Twa at a blow. Nae cauld, faint-hearted doubtings tease him: Death comes, wi' fearless eye he sees him; Wi' bluidy hand a welcome gies him : An' when he fa's, His latest draught o' breathin lea'es him In faint huzzas.
Page 112 - Wherefore, if meat make my brother to offend, I will eat no ^ flesh while the world standeth, * lest I make my brother to offend.
Page 161 - IT IS TRUE, I CANNOT PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF THE FLOWING POISON; GAIN-SEEKING AND CORRUPT MEN WILL, FOR PROFIT AND SENSUALITY, DEFEAT MY WISHES ; BUT NOTHING WILL INDUCE ME TO DERIVE A REVENUE FROM THE VICE AND MISERY OF MY PEOPLE.
Page 113 - O madness, to think use of strongest wines, And strongest drinks, our chief support of health, When God with these forbidden made choice to rear His mighty champion, strong above compare, Whose drink was only from the liquid brook ! Sams.
Page 5 - Shakspeare to open to me the worlds of imagination and the workings of the human heart, and Franklin, to enrich me with his practical wisdom, I shall not pine for want of intellectual companionship, and I may become a cultivated man, though excluded from what is called the best society in the place where I live.
Page 78 - ... he once covered his tongue and throat as far as he could reach with Cayenne pepper, in order to appreciate the 'delicious coldness of claret in all its glory
Page 150 - I wonder, Bill, whether it is true what they say of heaven being so happy — whether, now, it can be happier than sitting in the public, over a good jug of ale, with a fiddle going? I don't know a pleasure as comes up to that.
Page 120 - The more to work their will. Then to the mill they forced him straight, Where, as they bruised his bones, The miller swore to murder him Betwixt a pair of stones. The last time when they took him up, They served him worse than that, For with hot scalding liquor store, They washed him in a vat.
Page 107 - It is as the case of a mound of a reservoir: if this mound has in one place been broken, whatever care has been taken to make the repaired part as strong as possible, the probability is that if it give way again, it will be in that place.

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