A Connected Series of Notes on the Chief Revolutions of the Principal States which Composed the Empire of Charlemagne: From His Coronation in 814, to Its Dissolution in 1806: on the Geneaologies [!] of the Imperial House of Habsburgh, and of the Six Secular Electors of Germany; and on Roman, German, French and English Nobility

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J. White, 1807 - 296 pages
 

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Page 177 - I am not expert at description, nor can my fancy add any horrors to the picture ; but, sure, even conquerors themselves would weep at the hideous prospects now before me. The whole country, my dear country, lies one frightful waste, presenting only objects to excite terror, pity, and despair. The business of the husbandman and the shepherd are quite discontinued. The husbandman and the shepherd are become soldiers themselves, and help to ravage the soil they formerly cultivated.
Page iii - Succinct History of the geographical and political Revolutions of the Empire of Germany, or the principal States which composed the Empire of Charlemagne, from his Coronation in...
Page 176 - Mecklenburg with desolation. I know, Sire, that it seems unbecoming my sex, in this age of vicious refinement, to feel for one's country, to lament the horrors of war, or wish for the return of peace. I know you may think it more properly my province to study the...
Page 154 - To smell to a turf of fresh earth is wholesome for the body, no less are thoughts of mortality cordial to the soul.
Page 178 - It is impossible to express the confusion, even those who call themselves our friends create. Even those from whom we might expect redress oppress us with new calamities. From your justice, therefore, it is that we hope relief; to you even children and women may complain, whose humanity stoops to the meanest petition, and whose power is capable of repressing the greatest injustice. "I am, Sire, &c.
Page 176 - What an alteration at present from such a charming scene! I am not expert at description, nor can my fancy add any horrors to the picture ; but sure even conquerors themselves would weep at the hideous prospect now before me.
Page 80 - That the prince, who was elected in the German diet, acquired from that instant the subject kingdoms of Italy and Rome. II. But that he might not legally assume the titles of emperor and Augustus, till he had received the crown from the hands of the Roman...
Page 211 - most of the " princes in the western and southern divisions of " Germany separated themselves from the Germanic " body, and formed themselves into a league under " the protection of the Emperor of the French, with " the title of the confederated states of the Rhine. " On the 7th of the following August, the Emperor
Page 190 - ... periods. The wars that religion occasioned, and ambition fomented in France, through the reigns of Francis the Second, Charles the Ninth, Henry the Third, and a part of Henry the Fourth, ended: and the furies of the league were crushed by this great prince, about the same time. Philip the Second of Spain marks this period likewise by his death, and by the exhausted condition in which he left the monarchy he governed: which took the lead no longer in disturbing...

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