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without number or end, we cannot but consider the submersion of our little spheroïd as an infinitely less event in respect of the immeasureable universe, than the destruction of a city or an isle in respect of this habitable globe. Let a general flood, however, be supposed improbable in proportion to the magnitude of so ruinous an event, yet the concurrent evidences of it are completely adequate to the supposed improbability ; but, as we cannot here expatiate on those proofs, we proceed to the fourth important fact recorded in the Mofaick history; I mean the first propagation and early dispersion of mankind in separate families to separate places of residence.

Three sons of the just and virtuous man, whose lineage was preserved from the general inundation, travelled, we are told, as they began to multiply, in three large divisions variously subdivided : the children of YA'FET seem, from the traces of Sklavonian names, and the mention of their being enlarged, to have spread themselves far and wide, and to have produced the race, which, for want of a correct appellation, we call Tartarian ; the colonies, formed by the sons of HAM and Shem, appear to have been nearly simultaneous; and, among those of the latter branch, we find so many names incontestably preserved at this hour in Arabia, that we cannot

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hesitate in pronouncing them the same people, whom hitherto we have denominated Arabs; while the former branch, the most powerful and adventurous of whom were the progeny of Cush, Misr, and Rama (names remaining unchanged in Sanscrit, and highly revered by the Hindus), were, in all probability, the race, which I call Indian, and to which we may now give any other name, that

may

feem more proper and comprehensive.

The general introduction to the Jewish history closes with a very concise and obscure account of a presumptuous and mad attempt, by a particular colony, to build a splendid city and raise a fabrick of immense height, independently of the divine aid, and, it should seem, in defiance of the divine power ; a project, which was baffled by means appearing at first view inadequate to the purpose, but ending in violent diffention among the projectors, and in the ultimate separation of them: this event also seems to be recorded by the ancient Hindus in two of their Puránas; and it will be proved, I trust, on some future occasion, that the lion bursting from a pillar to destroy a blaspheming giant, and the dwarf, who beguiled and held in derision the magnificent Beli, are one and the same story related in a fynbolical style.

Now these primeval events are described as

having happened between the Orus and Euphrates, the mountains of Caucasus and the borders of India, that is, within the limits of Iràn; for, though most of the Mofaick names have been considerably altered, yet numbers of them remain unchanged: we still find Harrán in MeSopotamia, and travellers appear unanimous in fixing the fite of ancient Babel.

Thus, on the preceding suppofition, that the first eleven chapters of the book, which it is thought proper to call Genesis, are merely a preface to the oldest civil history now extant, we fee the truth of them confirmed by antecedent reasoning, and by evidence in part highly probable, and in part certain ; but the connection of the Mosaick history with that of the Gospel by a chain of fublime predictions unquestionably ancient, and apparently fulfilled, muft induce us to think the Hebrew narrative more than human in its origin, and consequently true in every fubftantial part of it, though possibly expressed in figurative language; as many learned and pious men have believed, and as the most pious may believe without injury, and perhaps with advantage, to the cause of revealed religion. If Moses then was endued with supernatural knowledge, it is no longer probable only, but absolutely certain, that the whole race of man proceeded from Iràn, as from a centre, whence they migrated at first in three great colonies; and that those three branches grew from a common stock, which had been miraculously preserved in a general convulsion and inundation of this globe.

Having arrived by a different path at the same conclusion with Mr. BRYANT as to one of those families, the most ingenious and enterprising of the three, but arrogant, cruel, and idolatrous, which we both conclude to be various shoots from the Hamian or Amonian branch, I shall add but little to my former observations on his profound and agreeable work, which I have thrice perused with increased attention and pleasure, though not with perfect acquiescence in the other less important parts of his plausible system. The sum of his arguinent seems reducible to three heads. First; “ if the deluge

really happened at the time recorded by “ Moses, those nations, whose monuments are

preserved or whose writings are accessible, " must have retained memorials of an event so

ftupendous and comparatively so recent; but “ in fact they have retained such memorials :" this reasoning seems just, and the fact is true beyond controversy: Secondly; “ those memorials

were expressed by the race of HAM, before " the use of letters, in rude sculpture or paint

ing, and mostly in symbolical figures of the

having happened between the O.cus and Eu. phrates, the mountains of Caucasus and the borders of India, that is, within the limits of Iràn; for, though most of the Mofaick names have been considerably altered, yet numbers of them remain unchanged: we still find Harrán in Mesopotamia, and travellers appear unanimous in fixing the fite of ancient Babel.

Thus, on the preceding supposition, that the first eleven chapters of the book, which it is thought proper to call Genefis, are merely a preface to the oldest civil history now extant, we fee the truth of them confirmed by antecedent reasoning, and by evidence in part highly probable, and in part certain ; but the connection of the Mofaick history with that of the Gospel by a chain of sublime predictions unquestionably ancient, and apparently fulfilled, must induce us to think the Hebrew narrative more than human in its origin, and consequently true in every substantial part of it, though possibly expressed in figurative language ; as many learned and pious men have believed, and as the most pious inay believe without injury, and perhaps with advantage, to the cause of revealed religion. If Moses then was endued with supernatural knowledge, it is no longer probable only, but absolutely certain, that the whole race of man proceeded from Iràn, as from a centre, whence they

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