Elements of Criticism

Front Cover
F.J. Huntington & Company, 1838 - 504 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 378 - But metaphorical language is proper when a man struggles to bear with dignity or decency a misfortune however great: the struggle agitates and animates the mind: Wolsey. Farewell, a long farewell, to all my greatness ! This is the state of man; to-day he puts forth The tender leaves of hope; to-morrow blossoms,
Page 241 - 21 That grows to seed: things rank and gross in nature Possess it merely. That it should come to this! But two months dead ! nay, not so much; not two;— Hyperion to a satyr: so loving to my mother, • So excellent a king, that was, to this, Visit her face too roughly.
Page 143 - Oh, who can hold a fire in his hand, By thinking on the frosty Caucasus?* Or cloy the hungry edge of Appetite, By bare imagination of a feast ? Or wallow naked in December snow, By thinking on fantastic summer's heat On, no! the apprehension of the good Gives but the greater feeling to the worse.
Page 233 - Esther, Act V. Sc. last. Me miserable! which way shall I fly Infinite wrath and infinite despair 1 Which way I fly is hell: myself am hell; And in the lowest deep, a lower deep Still threatning to devour me, opens 'wide; To which the hell I suffer seems a heav'n. Paradise Lost,
Page 406 - With thec conversing I forget all time ; All seasons and their change, all please alike. Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds ; pleasant the sun When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herbs, tree, fruit, and flow'r,
Page 351 - IV. 173. And Shakspeare personifies death and its operations in a manner singularly fanciful: Within the hollow crown That rounds the mortal temples of a king, Keeps Death his court; and there the antic sits, Scoffing his state, and grinning at his pomp ; Allowing him a breath, a little scene To
Page 352 - frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eye-lids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness 1 Why rather, Sleep, ly'st thou in smoky cribs, Upon uneasy pallets stretching thee, And hush'd with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber Than in the perfum'd chambers of the great, Under the canopies of cosily state, And lull'd with
Page 142 - it was great pity, so it was, This villainous saltpetre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly: and but for these vile guns He would himself have been a soldier. =— First Part Henry IV. Act I. Sc. 4. Passions and emotions.
Page 362 - For all the land which thou seest, to thee will 1 give it, and to thy seed for ever. And I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth; so that if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered.
Page 371 - also made a wine-press therein: he looked that it should bring forth grapes, and it brought forth wild grapes. And now, O inhabitants of Jerusalem, and men of Judah, judge, I pray you, betwixt me and my vineyard. What could have been done more to my vineyard, that I have

Bibliographic information