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PRINCIPAL OF THE COLLEGIATE AND COMMERCIAL SCHOOL,

THORP ARCH, NEAR TADCASTER ;

AND A UTILOR OF

“THE GRAMMAR,” “ELEMENTS OF LATIN GRAMMAR,"

BTC.

SEVENTH EDITION.

ADAPTFD TO THE RECENT STEREOTYPE EDITION OF THE

GRAMMAR.

LONDON:

LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, LONGMANS, & ROBERTS.

LONDON : Printed by SPOTTISWOODE & Co

Nen street Square.

ADVERTISEMENT

TO

THE FIFTH AND STEREOTYPE EDITION.

THE present impression has been carefully revised, and adapted throughout to the recent stereotype edition of the 12mo. Grammar. In several parts, alterations were obviously indispensable to render the volume in strict accordance with its companion. As the two works are now stereotyped, further alterations will be prevented.

The numbering of the Exercises corresponds with the Grammatical Lessons. When these latter are lengthy, the corresponding Exercises are broken into sections. In the more difficult portions, the substance of the leading rules, very briefly expressed, is prefixed to the Exercises. These are intended, not to interfere with, and far less to supersede the Grammar; but simply to supply a kind of remembrancer in the absence of that volume. In the preparation of each Lesson, the direct study of the Grammar must be enjoined ; and afterwards, the knowledge of the pupil tested by an application to the prescribed exercises

PREFACE.

Few words will be sufficient to explain the nature and utility of this Work.

1. The mere perusal of any didactic treatise, however plain its rules, and however cogent the author's reasoning may be, frequently conveys to the undisciplined mind only inadequate and transient ideas. This is particularly the case when the facts and principles are numerous, or when the subject is of such a nature as to require a greater degree of application than ordinary. In such instances, how little, how very little, in comparison of the whole, does the strongest capacity retain. If these remarks are applicable to individuals who feel interested in a subject, with how much greater force do they apply to the young. Persons accustomed to tuition well know that the natural volatility of youth renders them satisfied with the most vague and erroneous conceptions. Something is necessary, therefore, in their case, to induce them to consider a subject in all its bearings, that so it may become intelligible and familiar to the mind. Nothing conduces more to this end than frequent oral interrogations, pertinent illustrations, and a series of exercises on the various rules.

2. Besides familiarising the subject to the pupil, there are additional advantages to recommend the adoption of this method. By constantly analysing sentences, we not only readily detect the inaccuracy of any expression, which, from its not being in harmonious, would easily escape the vigilance of the ear; but, by being led to examine the signification of words, we gradually acquire the habit of correct verbal discrimination. Strange as it may appear, it is nevertheless true, that if we are not in early life accustomed to attend to the proper import of words, we rarely acquire the habit of doing so when advanced in years. Few men, for instance, whose education has in this respect been neglected, will, when perusing a volume of travels, history, poetry, &c. be disposed to break off in the thread of an interesting story, to refer to their dictionary for the definition of words of which they may unhappily be ignorant. Rather than submit to this drudgery, at such a period, they will leave them as so many blanks, or attach to them any meaning that may first present itself, however incorrect and erroneous it may be. No wonder, then, that we frequently hear men of inferior education, though of naturally strong minds, not only misapply words, but tenaciously adhere to such constructions of phrases as their own imperfect conceptions have affixed to them.

3. The First and Second Parts of the following work contain Questions and Exercises adapted to Orthography and Etymology, arranged in the exact order in which they should be studied. This mode, 80 obviously advantageous both to pupil and teacher, has hitherto been almost totally disregarded in works of this kind. The Third, Fourth, and Fifth Parts comprise Rules and Exercises adapted to Syntax, Punctuation, and Prosody. To each rule and note in the Grammar, corresponding exercises have been inserted in this volume, and which may easily be corrected by the information contained in the Grammar. At the close of every rule are given examples on all the notes promiscuously disposed, in order to exercise the ingenuity of the pupil, and to render him master of the subject. The necessity of this arrangement will be evident to the reader, when he considers that an individual, who might very readily correct any erroneous sentences when placed under their specific rules, might, nevertheless, be unable to do so when they occupy a different position. The same reason induced the insertion, at proper intervals, of miscellaneous examples on all the preceding rules. Under Perspicuity, the pupil is presented with a series of

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