Cassell's illustrated history of India, Volume 1

Front Cover
Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Company, 1883

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Contents

Progress of the War in the Carnatic c
23
Native of Madras
24
Capture of Arcot Defence of it by Clive Cauverypauk
28
Entrance to the Pagoda of Conjeveram
30
CHAPTER
36
Arrival of Major Lawrence at Coilady
37
Gheriah Reduced Calcutta Taken The Black Hole
41
Lord Clive
42
View of Government House Calcutta
49
Clive the Avenger Calcutta Retaken Hooghly and Chandernagore Reduced
49
View in Moorshedabad
54
Battle of Plassy Defeat Flight and Dethronement of the Nabob of Bengal by Colonel Clive
56
Assassination of Surajah Dowlah Cootes Expedition Trichinopoly Attacked again
59
Map of Bengal Behar and Orissa
60
Count de Lally His Instructions Sea Battle Surrender of Fort St David Count dAches Instructions Tanjore Attacked
63
View near Trichinopoly the Mosque of Nuthur 61 Map of the Presidency of Bombay
66
Progress of the British and French Campaign in India Siege of Madras and Capture of Conjeveram
70
View of Madras from the
73
SeaFight off Fort St David Affair off Wandiwash Defeat of Conflans by Colonel Forde Masulipatam Stormed Surat Taken
74
The Dutch in Bengal Battle of Wandiwash The Country Ravaged Chitapett Reduced
80
Capture of Arcot and Reduction of Pondicherry Fate of the Count de Lally Fall of the French Power in India
83
View of Chandernagore
84
Clive Returns to India for the Last Time
90
The Revolution in Bengal Meer Jaffier Deposed Meer Cossim Made Naboh His Quarrel with the Company
94
Meer Cossim Deposed Defeated by Major Adams Massacre of the Europeans at Patna Battles of Buxar and Korah
99
Clive Dictator in India State of the Country Discontents in the Bengal Army Reforms Continued
106
Conquest of the Philippine Isles Affairs of the Carnatic Hyder Ali
111
210
112
War with Hyder Ali The Chingama Pass Battle of Eroor
116
The Defence of Amboor Our Treaty with the Nizam Hyder Ali and the Zemindars of Bednore c
119
Narrow Escape of Colonel Woods Army at Mulwagul Annihilation of Nixons Detachment Hyder before Madras c
125
CHAPTER PAGE XXV Famine in Bengal Death of Lord Clive Interference of Government
130
Mohammed Ali The Company and the Ministry War with Tanjore
136
The Conquest of Tanjore
140
Judges Appointed in Bengal Balambangan Internal Dissension at Madras
143
Warren Hastings The First GovernorGeneral Affairs in Bengal c
149
Mohammed Reza Khan and the Rajah Nuncomar
153
The Treaty of Benares Rohilla War Battle of BabulNullah and Conquest of Rohilcund
158
Dissensions at Calcutta Affairs of Oude Revolt of the Matchlockmen
166
Salsette Conquered Treaty with Ragobah The Battle of Arass Fall of Ragobah the Mahratta
171
The Scottish East India Company Its Rise Progress and Destruction
177
The Conspiracy of Nuncomar His Arrest Trial and Execution
179
Extraordinary Proceedings in Bengal Duel between the GovernorGeneral and Mr Francis
186
A Quarrel with the Mahrattas The March of Colonel Leslie
190
Pondicherry Reduced again The March of Colonel Goddard
194
War with the Mahrattas Goddard Takes the Field Dubhoy and Ahmedabad Captured First Communication Overland Established by Warren Hastings
198
General Goddard entering Surat
199
Exploits of Captain Popham Capture of Gwalior Siege of Bassein Battle of Doogaur Goddards Disastrous Retreat The Treaty of Salbye
201
Gwalior
205
Of the Land and Sea Forces of the East India Company
207
Group of Brahmins
211
Hyder Ali and Swartz the Missionary Invasion of the Carnatic Destruction of Colonel Baillies Troops
212
Ruined Temple of Chillambaram
217
Sir E Coote Takes Command in the Carnatic Dačing Act of Lieutenant Flint Hyders Ships Destroyed The Pagoda of Chillambaram Attacked
218
Campaign of Colonel Fullarton
243
Religious Festival at Benares
247
Rebellion and Massacre at Benares Rout Flight and Dethronement of Cheyte Sing
249
The Begums of Oude The Gift to Hastings
254
Fyzoola Khan Resignation of Warren Hastings c
258
Attack on the Sepoys
259
Mr Pitts Bill for India Acquisition of Penang c
263
Lord Cornwallis
265
Cornwallis and His Measures The Kings and Companys Services c
268
The Esplanade Calcutta
271
Schemes of Tippoo The Lines of Travancore Their Defence by the Nairs
272
The First Campaign against Tippoo including the Successes of Colonels Stuart and Floyd Battle of Showroor Conquest of Malabar c
277
The Second Campaign against Tippoo Bangalore Stormed The Battle of Carigat
283
View of Seringapatam
289
Junction with the Mahrattas and the Retreat to Bangalore
290
Third Campaign against Tippoo Storming of Nundydroog Savandroog c Mr Franciss Motion in Parliament Lost
292
Group of Brinjarries
294
The Rajah of Coorg The Bad Feeling in Britain Review of the Army and Final Advance upon
297
Engagement between English and French Cruisers
300
Tippoo Humbled Sues for Peace Surrender of the Hostages Close of the War with Mysore
305
Charge of the Highlanders at Seringapatam
307
The Goddess Kali the Favourite Divinity of
313
Defeat of Gholaum Mohammed Khan Marriage of Vizier Ali The Dutch Settlements Reduced
317
Lord Teignmouth
319
Earl of Mornington in Office Intrigues between the French and Tippoo Sultan
323
Natives of Hyderabad
325
Preparations for the Final War with Tippoo The Battle of Malavelly
329
View at Malabar Hill near Bombay
331
Perspective Plan of Seringapatam indicating severally
337
The Fight in Balasore Roads Partition of Mysore Restoration of the Ancient Hindoo Dynasty
345
Conquest of Bundelcund Battle of Argaum Storming of Gawilghur and End of the
376
The War with Holkar Ochterlonys Defence of Delhi Our Victories at Ferruckabad and Deeg
389
Cornwallis again GovernorGeneral His Death and Tomb
401
The Earl of Minto GovernorGeneral Tragic Story of Lakshman the Robber Comonah Expedition
411
Naval Affairs in the Indian Seas 1807 to 1809
417
Capture of Goa Macao Isle of France Mauritius The Moluccas
436
The Earl of Moira GovernorGeneral The Nepaulese
450
View in the Himalayas
451
War with the Ghoorkas Valour and Success of Ochterlony Operations of General Wood Conquest
456
Intrigues of the Ghoorkas Cutch Subdued Opposition of the Hindoos to Taxation The Siege
470
CHAPTER PAGB XCI Detail of the Armies of Hindostan and the Deccan Scindias Treaty and Contingent Mountstuart Elphinstone and the Peishwa c
482
The Battle of Kirk ee Revolt of Apa Sahib The Battles of the Seetabuldee Hills and Nagpore Combat of Jubulpore c
488
Battle of Maheidpore Cholera Morbus Legend Concerning It Progress of the Pindaree War
498
The Battle of Koreigaum Continued Flight of the Peishwa c
506
Capture of Chanda and Riaghur The Killedar of Talnere
514
Operations in Candeish Fall of Malligaum Apa Sahib made Prisoner but Escapes Surrender of the Last Peishwa of the Mahrattas c
520
Of the Bheels and Gonds c Apa Sahib again in Arms His Flight
527
Preparations against Aseerghur Its Siege and Capture Close of the War and Its Results
531
British Rule in Central India The Kandyan War and Conquest of Ceylon
537
The Affairs of Cutch Quarrel with the Ameers of Scinde Insurrection in Goojerat Affairs of Oude and the Deccan Case of Palmer and Co
544
The Pirates of the Gulf Their Origin and Progress End of Lord Hastings Adıninistration
550
George Canning Appointed GovernorGeneral Resigns Lord Amherst Appointed Mr John Adams in the Interim Conducts the Administration c
557
The First Burmese War Capture of Rangoon The European Prisoners Mortality among the Troops c
564
The War with Burman Attack on the Great Pagoda at Rangoon Operations in Assam Arracan c
572

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Page 43 - Ugolino told in the sea of everlasting ice, after he had wiped his bloody lips on the scalp of his murderer, approaches the horrors which were recounted by the few survivors of that night. They cried for mercy. They strove to burst the door. Holwell who, even in that extremity, retained some presence of mind, offered large bribes to the gaolers.
Page 206 - A storm of universal fire blasted every field, consumed every house, destroyed every temple. The miserable inhabitants flying from their flaming villages in part were slaughtered ; others, without regard to sex, to age, to the respect of rank, or sacredness of function ; fathers torn from children, husbands from wives, enveloped in a whirlwind of cavalry, and amidst the goading spears of drivers, and the trampling of pursuing horses, were swept into captivity in an unknown and hostile land. Those...
Page 148 - The physical organization of the Bengalee is feeble even to effeminacy. He lives in a constant vapour bath. His pursuits are sedentary, his limbs delicate, his movements languid. During many ages he has been trampled upon by men of bolder and more hardy breeds. Courage, independence, veracity, are qualities to which his constitution and his situation are equally unfavourable.
Page 31 - Caesar, or of the Old Guard of Napoleon. The sepoys came to Clive, not to complain of their scanty fare, but to propose that all the grain should be given to the Europeans, who required more nourishment than the natives of Asia. The thin gruel, they said, which was strained away from the rice, would suffice for themselves. Histoiy contains no more touching instance of military fidelity, or of the influence of a commanding mind.
Page 228 - The alms of the settlement, in this dreadful exigency, were certainly liberal; and all was done by charity that private charity could do: but it was a people in beggary ; it was a nation which stretched out its hands for food. For months together, these creatures of sufferance, whose very excess and luxury in their most plenteous days had fallen short of the allowance of our austerest fasts, silent, patient, resigned, without sedition or disturbance, almost without complaint, perished by...
Page 144 - This purpose, formed in infancy and poverty, grew stronger as his intellect expanded and as his fortune rose. He pursued his plan with that calm but indomitable force of will which was the most striking peculiarity of his character. When, under a tropical sun, he ruled fifty millions of Asiatics, his hopes, amidst all the cares of war, finance, and legislation, still pointed to Daylesford. And when his long public life, so singularly chequered with good and evil, with glory and obloquy, had at length...
Page 205 - Arcot, he drew from every quarter whatever a savage ferocity could add to his new rudiments in the arts of destruction ; and, compounding all the materials of fury, havoc, and desolation, into one black cloud, he hung for a while on the declivities of the mountains.
Page 241 - Hundreds of devotees came hither every month to die ; for it was believed that a peculiarly happy fate awaited the man who should pass from the sacred city into the sacred river. Nor was superstition the only motive which allured strangers to that great metropolis. Commerce had as many pilgrims as religion. All along the shores of the venerable stream lay great fleets of vessels, ladeu with rich merchandise.
Page 183 - I do not trust to Mr. Francis's promises of candour, convinced that he is incapable of it. I judge of his public conduct by his private, which I have found to be void of truth. and honour.
Page 248 - Sir, the Nabob having determined to inflict corporal punishment upon the prisoners under your guard, this is to desire that his officers, when they shall come, may have free access to the prisoners, and be permitted to do with them as they shall see proper.

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