Constable's miscellany of original and selected publications

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Page 37 - Rochester ;" which the critic ought to read for its elegance, the philosopher for its arguments, and the saint for its piety.
Page 24 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 26 - To this he answered, a man could not write with life, unless he were heated by revenge : for to make a satire without resentments, upon the cold notions of philosophy, was as if a man would in cold blood, cut men's throats who had never offended him : and he said, the lies in these libels came often in as ornaments that could not be spared without spoiling the beauty of the poem.
Page 99 - Sermons in the year, for Proving the Christian Religion against notorious Infidels, viz., Atheists, Theists, Pagans, Jews, and Mahometans, not descending lower to any controversies that are among Christians themselves...
Page 217 - I did not, at the time, think the best. I have seen that I was sometimes in the wrong, but I did not err designedly. I have endeavoured, in private life, to do all the good in my power, and never for a moment could indulge malicious or unjust designs upon any person whatsoever.
Page 216 - ... thought proper for him. On Saturday he had been remarkably better, and we were not without some hopes of his recovery. " On Sunday, about eleven in the forenoon, his lordship sent for me, and said he felt a great hurry, and wished to have a little conversation with me in order to divert it.
Page 217 - I saw difficulties which staggered me ; but I kept my mind open to conviction. The evidences and doctrines of Christianity, studied with attention, made me a most firm and persuaded believer of the Christian religion.' I have made it the rule of my life, and it is the ground of my future hopes. I have erred and sinned ; but have repented, and never indulged any vicious habit. In politics and public life I have made public good the rule of my conduct.
Page 80 - Of the high veneration man's intellect owes to God, peculiarly for his wisdom and power,
Page 201 - THOSE who were skilful in anatomy, among the ancients, concluded, from the outward and inward make of a human body, that it was the work of a Being transcendently wise and powerful. As the world grew more enlightened in this art, their discoveries gave them fresh opportunities of admiring the conduct of Providence in the formation of a human body.
Page 331 - That John Bunyan, of the town of Bedford, labourer, being a person of such and such conditions, he hath, since such a time, devilishly and perniciously abstained from coming to church to hear Divine service, and is a common upholder of several unlawful meetings and conventicles, to the great disturbance and distraction of the good subjects of this kingdom, contrary to the laws of our sovereign lord the king, etc.

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