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0 0 38 8
0 0 40 0
0 0 41 4
0 0 42 80
0 0 44 00
0 0 45 40
0 0 46 80
0 0 48 0
0 0 49 40
0 0 50 80
0 0 520
0 0 53 40
0 0 54 8
0 0 56 00
0 0 57 4
0 0 588
0 0 600
0 0 61 40
0 0 62 8
0 0 64 0
0 0 65 4/0
0 0 66 8 0 1
0 1 19 0/01
0 1 25 4

01
0 1 38 8 01
01 520 09
0 1 65 4 09
0 3 628 10
11 600

13
1 57 4
2 1 54 8 30
2 3 520 3%
3 1 494
3 3 46 8 43
4 1 44 0 52
4 3 41 4

6 01
9 3 14 819 1
14 2 46 018 IS
19 9 29 41 942
24 228

30 93
1 44 0 36 3
34 1 17 4 49 S 31
39 0 58 8 490!
44 0 32 0 55 04
49 0 5 4 61 1 6

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Bricks per Thousand.

Labour, Mor. Labour, Mor. Labour, Mor- Labour, Mor- Labaur, Mor- Labour, Mor. tar, &c. per tar, &c. per tar, &c. per tar, &c. per

tar, &c. per tar, &c. per Rod, 34. 5s. Rod, 31. 10s. Rod, 31. 158. Rod, 41. Rod, 47. 58. Rod, 11. 1os.

13

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$. d.

d. 10 10 0 10 15 O 10 19 o 11 4 0 11 8 o 11 13 0 11 17 o 12 2 0 12 6 0 12 11 o 12 15 0 / 13 0 0 13

4 0 13 9 o 13 13 0 13 18 0 14 2 0 14 7 0 14 11 0 14 16 0 15 0 O 15 5 0 15 9 o 15 14

0 15 18 0 16 S 0 16 7 0 16 12 0 16 16 0 17 1 0 17 5 0 17 10 0

d. 11 0 0 11 9 0 1 18 0 12 0 12 16 0

5 0 13 14 o 14 3 o 14 12 o 15 1 0 15 10 0 15 19 0 16 8 o 16 17 O 17 6 0 17 15 o

d. 11 5 0 11 14 12 3 12 12 0 13 1 0i 13 10 0 13 19 0 14 8 0 14 17 0 15 o 15 15 0 16 0 16 19

0 17 2 0 17 11 0 18 0 o

2320. The following is a table of the decimal parts of a rod of reduced brickwork.

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1 2

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

·00367 00795 01102 *01470 01838 02206 -02573 02941 03309 03676 04044 04412 04779 05147 *05515 05882 0625 06617 06985 07353 •07721 *08088 08456 *08823 ·09191 *09559 *09926 •10294 •10662 11029 11397 •11765 •12132 •125 •12867 •13235 •13604 •13970 •14338 •14706

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66

•15073 •15441 •15809 •16176 •16544 •16912 •17279 -17647 18015 .18382 .1875

19117 •19485 19852 20221 20588 20956 21323 -21691 •22059 .22426 .22794 23162 .23529 .23897 .24265 .24632 .25 .25367 25735 26103 .26470 •26838 •27206 •27573 .27941 28309 *28676 .29044 29412

81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107

.29779 •30147 •30515 •30882 3125 31617 •31985 •32353 .32720 •33088 -33456 33823 34191 34559 •34926 .35294 35602 36029 .36397 36765 37132 •375 •37867 98235 .38604 38970 •39338 39706 •40073 40441 •40809 •41176 •41544 •41912 -42279 42647 •43015 •43382 •4375 -44117

121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 195 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160

.44485
44852
•45220
•45588
•45956
•46323
•46691
-47059
•47426
•47794
.48162
-48529
-48897
•49265
-49632
.5
•50637
50735
51102
51 470
•51838
52206
:52573
•52941
•53309
53676
•54044
•54412
.54779
•55147
55515
55882
5625
56617
56985
57353
57721
•58088
.58456
•58823

161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200

59191 •59559 •59926 *60294 *60662 .61029 .61397 .61765 -62132 625 .62867 63235 63604 .63971 64338 .64706 .65073 *65441 65809 *661 76 -66544 66912 67279 .67647 .68015 .68382 *6875 69117 -69485 •69853 70221 •70588 •70956 71323 71691 72059 72426 •72794 73162 73529

25

68

108

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 98 39 40

70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80

109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120

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The use of the foregoing tables it can scarcely be necessary to explain, They are such as to indicate, on inspection, their value; and we shall therefore leave them without further comment for their application.

2322. When work is performed by the day, or the materials used are to be numbered, as ofttimes necessarily occurs, fire bricks, red rubbers, best marle stocks for cutters, second best ditto, pickings, common bricks, place bricks, paving bricks, kiln-burnt bricks, and Dutch clinkers are charged by the thousand.

2323. Red rubbers, kiln and fire-burnt bricks, are also charged by the hundred. Foot tiles and ten inch tiles are charged either by the thousand or hundred.

2324. Sunk foot tiles and ten-inch tiles with five holes, now never used in the south of England, are charged by the piece.

2325. Pantiles, plaintiles, and nine-inch tiles are charged by the thousand.

2326. Oven and Welsh oven tiles, Welsh fire lumps, fire bricks, and chimney pots are also sold by the piece.

2327. Sand, clay, and loam are charged by the load ; lime sometimes by the hundred weight; but the hundred of 100 pecks is the more usual measure in and about the metropolis, Dutch terras is charged by the bushel, which is also sometimes the measure of lime. Portland and other cements are similarly charged. Plaster by the bag.

2328. Pantile and plaintile laths are charged by the bundle or load; hair and mortar by the load; hip books and T tiles by the piece.

2329 Neither here, nor in the following pages, is it intended to convey to the reader more than the principles on which an estimate is founded. The prices of materials are in a state of constant Huctuation ; something approaching a constant value, from the known performance of a good workinan, was given in the previous editions from the computations of Peter Nicholson, but they are now omitted. Wood working machinery has also altered the values very materially.

CARPENTRY AND JOINERY. 2330. The works of the CARPENTER are the preparation of piles, sleepers, and planking, and other large timbers, formerly much, but now rarely, used in foundations; the centering on which vaults are turned; wall plates, lintels, and bond timbers; naked flooring, quarter partitions, roofing, battening to walls, ribbed ceilings for the formation of vaulting, coves, and the like in lath and plaster, posts, &c.

2331. In large measures, where the quantity of materials and workmanship is uniform, the articles are usually measured by the square of 100 feet. Piles should be measured by the foot cube, and the driving by the foot run according to the quality of the ground into which they are driven. Sleepers and planking are measured and estimated by the foot, yard, or the square.

2332. Plain centering is measured by the square ; but the ribs and boarding, being different qualities of work, should be taken separately. The dimensions are obtained by girting round the arch, and multiplying by the length. Where groins occur, besides the measurement as above, the angles must be measured by the foot run, that is, the ribs and boards are to be measured and valued separately, according to the exact superficial contents of each, and the angles by the linear foot, for the labour in fitting the ribs and boards, and waste of wood.

2333. Wall plates, bond timbers, and lintels are measured by the cubic foot, and go under the denomination of fir in bond.

2334. In the measurement and valuation of naked flooring, we may take it either by the square or the cube foot. To form an idea of its value, it is to be observed, that in equal cubic quantities of small and large timbers the latter will have more superficies than the former, whence the saving is not in proportion to the solid contents; and the value, therefore, of the workmanship will not be as the cubic quantity. The trouble of moving timbers increases with their weight, hence a greater expenditure of time ; which, though not in an exact ratio with the solid quantity, will not be vastly different, their sections not varying considerably in their dimensions. As the value of the saving upon a cube foot is comparatively small to that of the work performed by the carpenter, the whole cost of labour and materials may be ascertained with sufficient accuracy when the work is uniform.

2335. When girders occur in naked flooring, the uniformity of the work is thereby interrupted by the murtices and tenons which become necessary; thus the amount arising from the cubic quantity of the girders would not be sufficient at the same rate per foot as is put on the other parts, not only because of the difference of the size, but because of the mortices which are cut for the reception of the tenons of the binding joists. Hence, for valuing the labour and materials, the whole should be measured and valued by the cubic quantity, and an additional rate must be put upon every solid foot of the girders ; or, if the binding joists be not inserted in the girders at :he usual distances, a fixed price must be put upon every mortice and tenou in proportion to their size, The binding joists are

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